Morning Edition for March 21, 2013 Hear the Morning Edition program for March 21, 2013

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People wait in line to use the ATM at a bank in the Cypriot capital Nicosia. Patrick Baz/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Patrick Baz/AFP/Getty Images

Why Cyprus Matters

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Egyptians use their mobile phones to record celebrations in Cairo's Tahrir Square, the epicenter of the popular revolt that drove Hosni Mubarak from power in 2011. Twitter was often used to record happenings during the Arab Spring. Mohammed Abed/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mohammed Abed/AFP/Getty Images

On Its 7th Birthday, Is Twitter Still The 'Free Speech Party'?

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House Budget Committee Chairman Rep. Paul Ryan, R-Wis., holds a copy of his budget plan during a news conference last week. On Thursday, the Republican-controlled House narrowly passed the measure. The Senate is not expected to follow suit. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP

On Message: Budget Votes May Matter ... In 2014

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David Wilson (left) and Rob Compton embrace after being married by a Unitarian minister at the Arlington Street Church in Boston on May 17, 2004. They were one of the first couples in Massachusetts to be legally wed. Stan Honda/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Stan Honda/AFP/Getty Images

As Gay Marriage Heads To Court, A Look Back At The Bumpy Ride

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Dunya Mikhail is an Iraqi-American poet who teaches in Michigan. She has published five books in Arabic and two in English. Michael Smith/Courtesy of Dunya Mikhail hide caption

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Michael Smith/Courtesy of Dunya Mikhail

Revisiting Iraq Through The Eyes Of An Exiled Poet

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