Morning Edition for April 8, 2013 Hear the Morning Edition program for April 8, 2013

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Far from seeing military rallies, recent visitors to Pyongyang saw North Korean children in-line skating around Kim Il Sung square. Courtesy of Patrick Thornquist hide caption

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Courtesy of Patrick Thornquist

Inside North Korea, No Obvious Signs Of Crisis

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Osama bin Laden's son-in-law, Sulaiman Abu Ghaith (center), pleaded not guilty to a charge of conspiracy to kill Americans on March 8. He is set to appear in a federal court Monday. Elizabeth Williams/AP hide caption

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Elizabeth Williams/AP

Osama Bin Laden's Son-In-Law Set To Appear In N.Y. Court

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Hundreds of gun owners and enthusiasts attend a rally at the Connecticut Capitol in Hartford on Jan. 19. Rick Hartford/MCT/Landov hide caption

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Rick Hartford/MCT/Landov

Some Gun Control Opponents Cite Fear Of Government Tyranny

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Composer Richard Einhorn lost most of his hearing several years ago, but that hasn't held him back, thanks to state-of-the-art digital hearing aids. Kevin Rivoli/AP hide caption

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Kevin Rivoli/AP

Listen Up To Smarter, Smaller Hearing Aids

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John Silloway fixes maple sap lines in Randolph, Vt., in February 2011. Toby Talbot/AP hide caption

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Toby Talbot/AP

Vermont Finds High-Tech Ways To Sap More Money From Maple Trees

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President Obama signs a series of executive orders on gun control Jan. 16 surrounded by children who wrote letters to the White House about gun violence. They are, from left, Hinna Zeejah, Taejah Goode, Julia Stokes and Grant Fritz. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Why Politicians Want Children To Be Seen And Heard

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Car2Go vehicles lined up in Washington, D.C., as the company prepared to launch service there last year. The car sharing service is also in Europe and other American cities, including Seattle; Austin, Texas; Miami; and Portland, Ore. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

What Drives Us? Car Sharing Reflects Cultural Shift

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The Wu-Tang Clan. Clockwise from left: Ol' Dirty Bastard, the GZA, the RZA, Inspectah Deck, Masta Killa, Raekwon and Ghostface Killah. Center, from left, Method Man and U-God. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Courtesy of the artist

The Wu-Tang Clan's 20-Year Plan

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Margaret Thatcher became Britain's first female prime minister in 1979 and served until 1990. In 1992, she was elevated to the House of Lords to become Baroness Thatcher of Kesteven. Thatcher died Monday at age 87 following a stroke, her spokesman said. Harry Dempster/Express/Getty Images hide caption

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Harry Dempster/Express/Getty Images

Britain's Iron Lady, Former Prime Minister Thatcher, Dies

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