Morning Edition for April 23, 2013 Hear the Morning Edition program for April 23, 2013

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The crowd at Richie Havens' Woodstock-opening set on Aug. 15, 1969. Paul DeMaria/New York Daily News via Getty Images hide caption

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Paul DeMaria/New York Daily News via Getty Images

Richie Havens, Folk Singer Who Opened Woodstock, Has Died

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Lucy Wang and Derek Wei represent the new modern Chinese bride and groom. With a lack of women in China, Wei had to pay more than $10,000 in a "bride price" to attract Wang to marry him. Sim Chi Yin for NPR hide caption

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Sim Chi Yin for NPR

For Chinese Women, Marriage Depends On Right 'Bride Price'

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Brown University student Sunil Tripathi, who has been missing since March, was wrongly identified in social media as a suspect in the Boston Marathon bombings. Reddit has apologized to Tripathi's family "for the pain they have had to endure." Brown University/AP hide caption

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Brown University/AP

Social Media's Rush To Judgment In The Boston Bombings

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Wanda Rayborn, 63, was homeless for nine years and was living under a tree in downtown San Diego two years ago. She now lives in a newly renovated efficiency apartment — part of an initiative to help get homeless people off the streets. Pam Fessler/NPR hide caption

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Pam Fessler/NPR

Changes Help San Diego Homeless, But Long Road Remains Ahead

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A Fish and Wildlife Service team caught and killed an alligator after the animal attacked a 6-year-old boy Friday. The boy survived with only incidental wounds. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service hide caption

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U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Father Saves Boy From Alligator Attack, With A Stranger's Help

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