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Pierre Deom has been writing and illustrating La Hulotte since 1972. He released his 100th issue (lower right) in November. Francois Nascimbeni/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Francois Nascimbeni/AFP/Getty Images

Media

In Troubled Magazine World, 'La Hulotte' Is One Rare Bird

Former science teacher Pierre Deom started writing, illustrating and publishing the French nature journal to educate kids about the environment. Forty years later, the magazine is so popular it sometimes receives 1,300 letters a day.

Villages in the Lower Shire valley of Malawi, like this one named Jasi, rely heavily on subsistence farming and steady rainfall, and are struggling to produce steady harvests. Jennifer Ludden/NPR hide caption

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Jennifer Ludden/NPR

The Salt

Malawian Farmers Say Adapt To Climate Change Or Die

7 min

Malawian Farmers Say Adapt To Climate Change Or Die

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Two African penguins stretch their flippers at the Maryland Zoo. Adam Cole/NPR hide caption

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Adam Cole/NPR

Animals

RoboCop? How About RoboPenguin!

3 min

RoboCop? How About RoboPenguin!

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Pierre Deom has been writing and illustrating La Hulotte since 1972. He released his 100th issue (lower right) in November. Francois Nascimbeni/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Francois Nascimbeni/AFP/Getty Images

In Troubled Magazine World, 'La Hulotte' Is One Rare Bird

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An ATM at a Chase lobby in New York is part of what company executives are touting as a "branch of the future" — a place where machines distribute exact change and count cash so tellers don't have to. Mary Altaffer/AP hide caption

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Mary Altaffer/AP

All Tech Considered

Banks Try To Save Big With 'ATMs Of The Future'

3 min

Banks Try To Save Big With 'ATMs Of The Future'

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Even when a flood obliterates homes, as Superstorm Sandy did in 2012 in the Rockaway neighborhood of Queens, N.Y., the urge to rebuild can be strong. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Environment

Federal Flood Insurance Program Drowning In Debt. Who Will Pay?

4 min

Federal Flood Insurance Program Drowning In Debt. Who Will Pay?

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James King's Three Chords and the Truth, an album of country songs reimagined as bluegrass, is up for a Grammy. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Courtesy of the artist

James King Distills Country Gems To 'Three Chords And The Truth'

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