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C. Nash smokes after possession of marijuana became legal in Washington state on Dec. 6, 2012. Ted S. Warren/AP hide caption

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Ted S. Warren/AP

Shots - Health News

Evidence On Marijuana's Health Effects Is Hazy At Best

States are legalizing marijuana even though there's no clear understanding of its impact on health. The drug hasn't been subjected to the kind of rigorous medical research that would find that out.

In arguments Monday, 68-year-old Florida inmate Freddie Lee Hall is challenging the state's use of an IQ cutoff to determine mental disability. Florida Department of Corrections/AP hide caption

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Florida Department of Corrections/AP

With Death Penalty, How Should States Define Mental Disability?

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C. Nash smokes after possession of marijuana became legal in Washington state on Dec. 6, 2012. Ted S. Warren/AP hide caption

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Ted S. Warren/AP

Evidence On Marijuana's Health Effects Is Hazy At Best

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The teenage years are the last golden opportunity to build a healthy brain, researchers say. So smoking pot might not be so smart. Tomas Rodriguez/Corbis hide caption

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Tomas Rodriguez/Corbis

Marijuana May Hurt The Developing Teen Brain

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E-cigarettes was a $2 billion industry last year and it's expected to hit $5 billion this year. Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images

E-Cigarette Critics Worry New Ads Will Make 'Vaping' Cool For Kids

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