Morning Edition for March 11, 2014 Hear the Morning Edition program for March 11, 2014

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Science

Trapping And Tracking The Mysterious Snowy Owl

This winter's unexpected arctic bird invasion has given owl researchers a rare opportunity. They're fitting a few of the errant owls with GPS backpacks to track their return to the Arctic.

Workers build a concrete barrier along the coast of suburban Kesennuma, northeastern Japan, which was hard hit by the devastating tsunami in 2011. Nationwide, Japan has poured concrete to defend nearly half of its shoreline. Critics say much of it is unnecessary. Lucy Craft for NPR hide caption

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Lucy Craft for NPR

In Tsunami's Wake, Fierce Debate Over Japan's 'Great Wall'

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Iraqi Shiite mourners carry the coffin of a soldier killed in clashes with anti-government fighters in Fallujah earlier this month. The government faces a months-long crisis in Anbar province, where it has lost the city of Fallujah as well as shifting parts of provincial capital Ramadi to anti-government militants. AFP/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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AFP/AFP/Getty Images

In Iraq, Anbar Faces Extremists Stronger Than Those U.S. Fought

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The digester eggs at Newtown Creek Wastewater Treatment Plant in Brooklyn contain millions of gallons of black sludge. Courtesy of New York City Department of Environmental Protection hide caption

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Courtesy of New York City Department of Environmental Protection

Turning Food Waste Into Fuel Takes Gumption And Trillions Of Bacteria

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Washington Post advice columnist Judith Martin compares surveys to an insecure friend: " 'Are you sure you like me? Really? Do you like me?' And after a while you want to say, 'No! Go away!' " iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

Customer Surveys Are Here To Stay. Suggestions For Improvement?

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Already one of the longest-serving attorneys general in history, Eric Holder says he has no immediate plans or timetable to leave. Here, he speaks at the annual Attorneys General Winter Meeting in Washington on Feb. 25. Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP hide caption

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Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP

Holder Speaks Out On Snowden, Drone Policy, Softening Sentences

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Inmates at New York's Coxsackie Correctional Facility. Gov. Andrew Cuomo says reinstating state-funded prison college programs will ultimately save taxpayers money. Mike Groll/AP hide caption

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Mike Groll/AP

N.Y. Governor Says College For Inmates Will Pay Off For Taxpayers

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