Morning Edition for March 28, 2014 Hear the Morning Edition program for March 28, 2014

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The 2014 film Noah has stirred up the ire of some conservative Christians, who accuse the filmmakers of using a story about environmental catastrophe to push a message about climate change and conservation. Niko Tavernise/Courtesy of Paramount Pictures hide caption

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Niko Tavernise/Courtesy of Paramount Pictures

Movies

This Year, Biblical Films Are Fruitful And Multiplying

There's a flood of biblical proportions this year in Hollywood: Noah, Exodus and Son of God are all hitting big screens in 2014. What meaning hath this year's spate of Bible-based films?

Maygan Rollins, a field organizer with Enroll America, talked health insurance options with Jerry Correa during a recent campaign in Miami. Lynne Sladky/AP hide caption

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Lynne Sladky/AP

Obamacare's National Enrollment Looks OK, But States Matter More

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The 1990s were rife with low-fat packaged snacks, from potato chips to cookies. Youtube and RetroJunk hide caption

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Youtube and RetroJunk

Why We Got Fatter During The Fat-Free Food Boom

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International Monetary Fund Managing Director Christine Lagarde in Brussels earlier this year. Lagarde says women are underutilized in the global economy. Geert Vanden Wijngaert/AP hide caption

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Geert Vanden Wijngaert/AP

IMF's Lagarde: Women In Workforce Key To Healthy Economies

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The 2014 film Noah has stirred up the ire of some conservative Christians, who accuse the filmmakers of using a story about environmental catastrophe to push a message about climate change and conservation. Niko Tavernise/Courtesy of Paramount Pictures hide caption

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Niko Tavernise/Courtesy of Paramount Pictures

This Year, Biblical Films Are Fruitful And Multiplying

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Jessica and Anthony Villarreal in December 2011, more than three years after the explosion that severely burned Anthony in Afghanistan. Courtesy of Jessica Villarreal hide caption

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Courtesy of Jessica Villarreal

Marine Draws Strength From His Marriage To Recover From Burns

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Family members huddle at the fence to talk to loved ones living across the border. Kainaz Amaria/NPR hide caption

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Kainaz Amaria/NPR

Born From The Border, Tijuana Grows In New Ways

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Michael Peña plays Cesar Chavez in the film about the activist. Courtesy of Lionsgate hide caption

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Courtesy of Lionsgate

In 'Cesar Chavez,' A Reluctant Hero Fights For 'La Causa'

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