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A group of 3,000 ordinary citizens, armed with nothing more than an Internet connection, is often making better forecasts of global events than CIA analysts. Here, a man crosses the CIA logo at its headquarters in Langley, Va. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

Parallels

So You Think You're Smarter Than A CIA Agent

When 3,000 average citizens were asked to forecast global events, some consistently made predictions that turned out to be more accurate than those made with classified intelligence.

A piece of tin-enameled ceramic found at what archaeologists say is the site of a former French colony in St. Louis. Steph Zimmerman/St. Louis Public Radio hide caption

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Steph Zimmerman/St. Louis Public Radio

Scientists Discover Remnants Of St. Louis' French Colonial Past

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Karl Sutton leaves his mobile greenhouse in Montana. He sells spinach as part of a farmers co-op, and likes that nonprofit business model for his health insurance, too. Eric Whitney for NPR hide caption

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Eric Whitney for NPR

Small Health Insurance Co-Ops Seeing Early Success

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Arkansas Sen. Mark Pryor speaks to reporters at his Little Rock campaign headquarters on Feb. 28. A minimum wage increase on the ballot alongside Pryor could give Democrats more of a reason to show up on Election Day. Danny Johnston/AP hide caption

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Danny Johnston/AP

In Arkansas, Voters May Get Chance To Raise Minimum Wage

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A group of 3,000 ordinary citizens, armed with nothing more than an Internet connection, is often making better forecasts of global events than CIA analysts. Here, a man crosses the CIA logo at its headquarters in Langley, Va. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

So You Think You're Smarter Than A CIA Agent

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A nurse of the 'Doctors without Borders' medical aid organisation examines a patient in the in-take area at a center for victims of the Ebola virus in Guekedou, on April 1, 2014. The viral haemorrhagic fever epidemic raging in Guinea is caused by several viruses which have similar symptoms — the deadliest and most feared of which is Ebola. Seyllou/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Seyllou/AFP/Getty Images

Why Is Guinea's Ebola Outbreak So Unusual?

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Students from CUNY's AstroCom NYC program meet for a weekly class at the American Museum of Natural History in New York City. Dennis Robbins, an associate professor of science education at CUNY's Hunter College, teaches Betsy Hernandez (from left), Jaquelin Erazo, Ariel Diaz and Mario Martin. Beth Fertig/WNYC hide caption

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Beth Fertig/WNYC

Changing The Face Of Astronomy Research

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Comments on the Lent Madness website have gotten heated. Mark D. writes, "So I got my wish: JS Bach is in the mix. But he's in the same bracket with the Wesleys and Thomas Merton?? This is going to be ugly." Courtesy of Adam Thomas/Lent Madness hide caption

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Courtesy of Adam Thomas/Lent Madness

For 'Lent Madness,' Reverend Pits Saints Against Each Other

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Paycheck Players: Love of the game may no longer be enough motivation for college athletes. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

Deford: Paying College Athletes Would Level The Playing Field

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