Morning Edition for July 3, 2014 Hear the Morning Edition program for July 3, 2014

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ShamsArd, a Palestinian architecture firm, uses packed earth to construct its environmentally friendly homes. Emily Harris/NPR hide caption

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Emily Harris/NPR

Parallels

With Dirt And A Vision, Palestinian Architects Break The Mold

In the city of Jericho in the West Bank, there's a new home that looks like it might be from another planet. But in fact, its designers took pains to use materials that were as local as possible.

The heart beats in a mouse embryo grown with stem cells made from blood. Now the research that claimed a simple acid solution could be used to create those cells has been retracted. Courtesy of Haruko Obokata hide caption

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Courtesy of Haruko Obokata

Easy Method For Making Stem Cells Was Too Good To Be True

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Biker Ron Hamberg says he's read Dickens, Twain and Gandhi's autobiography, but as for books about motorcycles, "I just ride 'em, I don't read about 'em." Solvejg Wastvedt hide caption

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Solvejg Wastvedt

Vroom, Vroom, Hmmmm: Motorcycles As Literary Metaphor

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Sick with chikungunya, Karla Sepulveda, 5, waits in a public hospital with her grandmother in Boca Chica, Dominican Republic, on May 15. The Caribbean nation has reported more than 100,000 cases this year. Ezequiel Abiu Lopez/AP hide caption

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Ezequiel Abiu Lopez/AP

Chikun-What? A New Mosquito-Borne Virus Lands In The U.S.

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If the government scales back its terrorism insurance program, the cost of doing business in America's downtowns could rise significantly. Gary Hershorn/Insider Images/EPA/Landov hide caption

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Gary Hershorn/Insider Images/EPA/Landov

An Uncertain Future For The U.S. Terrorism Insurance Program

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In this photo, released July 17, 1989, a U.S. marshal keeps his pistol trained on suspects as other marshals raid a crack house in Washington, D.C. The city's crack epidemic lasted from the late '80s to the early '90s. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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Scott Applewhite/AP

Addiction Battled Ambition For Reporter Caught In D.C.'s Crack Epidemic

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Iraqi Shiite volunteers with the Labayk ya Hussein Brigade take part in a training session in the holy city of Najaf in late June. Clerics in the city called for Shiites to step forward and fight the Sunni group formerly known as the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (which now calls itself simply the Islamic State). Haidar Hamdan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Haidar Hamdan/AFP/Getty Images

In Iraq's Sacred City Of Najaf, Clerics Call On Shiites To Fight

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Iraqi policemen take up positions on a bridge north of Baghdad on Monday. There's a consensus among Western and Middle Eastern states that militants from the Islamic State pose a serious threat to the region. But there's no sign yet that countries like the United States, Russia and Iran are prepared to work together. Ahmed Saad/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Ahmed Saad/Reuters/Landov

For Once, The U.S., Russia And Iran Actually Agree On Something

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A mother and daughter herd their yaks along a highway on the Tibetan plateau. Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images

With Help From Extinct Humans, Tibetans Adapted To High Altitude

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ShamsArd, a Palestinian architecture firm, uses packed earth to construct its environmentally friendly homes. Emily Harris/NPR hide caption

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Emily Harris/NPR

With Dirt And A Vision, Palestinian Architects Break The Mold

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