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Black demonstrators run down a Natchez, Miss., street in 1967 after a report that several white youths with a gun were near. The town's civil rights past informs author Greg Iles' crime fiction. AP hide caption

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Crime In The City

Writer Plumbs 'Nature Of Evil' In Hometown's Violent, Civil Rights Past

Greg Iles sets his thrillers in the antebellum river city of Natchez, Miss. His latest book, Natchez Burning, pulls from true stories of the racial violence that gripped the state 50 years ago.

A Palestinian carries a wounded girl in the emergency room of Shifa Hospital in Gaza City. The city's main hospital is filled with the wounded, and many others have taken refuge on the hospital grounds. Lefteris Pitarakis/AP hide caption

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Lefteris Pitarakis/AP

In Crowded Gaza, Civilians Have Few Places To Flee

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Florida Sen. Marco Rubio, shown here at an event in Washington last month, spoke with NPR's Morning Edition about the country's economic challenges. Molly Riley/AP hide caption

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Molly Riley/AP

Rubio: Small Government Can Help Fix Economic Inequality

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Kentucky hog farmer Travis Hood with Luther, a young Red Wattle boar. Hood started raising Red Wattles five years ago after cuts to his job, and began turning a profit on the meat in February. Courtesy of Hood's Heritage Hogs hide caption

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Courtesy of Hood's Heritage Hogs

To Save These Pigs, Ky. Farmer Says We Have To Eat Them

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Taneka Armstrong, 20, is learning about different aspects of the tech industry — from coding to sales — through the nonprofit group Hack the Hood. Aarti Shahani/NPR hide caption

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Aarti Shahani/NPR

Next To Silicon Valley, Nonprofits Draw Youth Of Color Into Tech

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Florida's state capitol. A redistricting plan crafted by the Republican-controlled Legislature in Tallahassee was partially thrown out by a state judge. iStockPhoto hide caption

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iStockPhoto

Legal Battle Looms Over Florida Congressional Districts

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Black demonstrators run down a Natchez, Miss., street in 1967 after a report that several white youths with a gun were near. The town's civil rights past informs author Greg Iles' crime fiction. AP hide caption

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AP

Writer Plumbs 'Nature Of Evil' In Hometown's Violent Civil Rights Past

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