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Russia established the Crimean port of Sevastopol in the 18th century. After the Soviet breakup in 1991, Russia and Ukraine shared the naval base. But Russia has now taken the entire base, including Ukrainian ships. Max Avdeev for NPR hide caption

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Max Avdeev for NPR

Parallels

In Crimea, Many Signs Of Russia, Few Of Resistance

Russia's takeover of Crimea extends from the flags over government buildings to passports to the labels on wine bottles. Despite the international criticism, many Crimeans are happy to rejoin Moscow.

Russia established the Crimean port of Sevastopol in the 18th century. After the Soviet breakup in 1991, Russia and Ukraine shared the naval base. But Russia has now taken the entire base, including Ukrainian ships. Max Avdeev for NPR hide caption

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Max Avdeev for NPR

In Crimea, Many Signs Of Russia, Few Of Resistance

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Dr. Angela Alday talks with Isidro Hernandes, via a Spanish-speaking interpreter, Armando Jimenez. Both patient and doctor say they much prefer an in-person interpreter to one on the phone. Jeff Schilling/Courtesy of Tuality Healthcare hide caption

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Jeff Schilling/Courtesy of Tuality Healthcare

In The Hospital, A Bad Translation Can Destroy A Life

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James Ellroy's novels include The Black Dahlia, The Big Nowhere and, most recently, Perfidia. He lives in Los Angeles, the setting for much of his work. Christopher Polk/Getty Images for AFI hide caption

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Christopher Polk/Getty Images for AFI

Watch This: Crime Writer James Ellroy Recommends — What Else? — Noir Films

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The author's mother, Reba Roy (far left), dancing on stage in a sari as a young woman. Courtesy of Sandip Roy hide caption

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Courtesy of Sandip Roy

Love Is Saying 'Sari': The Quest To Save A South Asian Tradition

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Martha Frazier rides a bus to vote in Miami in 2012. This year, Georgia churches are running similar "Souls to the Polls" programs, busing worshipers to early voting locations after Sunday service. J Pat Carter/AP hide caption

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J Pat Carter/AP

After Sunday Service, Georgia Churches Get Souls To The Polls

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