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Defense attorneys for terrorism suspects at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, are now allowed to introduce details regarding their clients' interrogations after the so-called "torture report" was released by the Senate Intelligence Committee late last year. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

National Security

'Torture Report' Reshapes Conversation In Guantanamo Courtroom

Last year's release of a Senate report on CIA interrogation practices means lawyers for the accused Sept. 11 plotters can now discuss in court the treatment they say their clients endured.

Saudi women, shown here at a cultural festival near the capital Riyadh on Sunday, still need the permission of male relatives to travel and even receive certain medical procedures, but a growing number are entering the workforce. Fayez Nureldine/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Fayez Nureldine/AFP/Getty Images

Saudi Women Still Can't Drive, But They Are Making It To Work

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Smoke rises from chimneys of coal-based power plants in the Sonbhadra District of Uttar Pradesh, India. The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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The Washington Post/Getty Images

Young Indians Learn To Fight Pollution To Save Lives

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Tea Party supporter William Temple protests against President Obama's health care law outside the Supreme Court in 2012. David Goldman/AP hide caption

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David Goldman/AP

6 Years On, Is The Tea Party Here To Stay?

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Kurt Busch drives during the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series auto race in Fort Worth, Texas, on Nov. 2, 2014. Busch was recently suspended indefinitely amid domestic violence accusations. Larry Papke/AP hide caption

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Larry Papke/AP

An Uneventful Week In Sports Could Still Go Down In History

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With the technology to conduct more nuanced tests, some companies say they can provide more useful detail about how people think in dynamic situations. Marcus Butt/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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Marcus Butt/Getty Images/Ikon Images

Recruiting Better Talent With Brain Games And Big Data

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Defense attorneys for terrorism suspects at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, are now allowed to introduce details regarding their clients' interrogations after the so-called "torture report" was released by the Senate Intelligence Committee late last year. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

'Torture Report' Reshapes Conversation In Guantanamo Courtroom

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Steve Green in the basement of the Washington Design Center, which was recently demolished as part of the construction for the Museum of the Bible. Green and his family, owners of Hobby Lobby, are building the Museum of the Bible. Andre Chung for The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Andre Chung for The Washington Post/Getty Images

D.C. Bible Museum Will Be Immersive Experience, Organizers Say

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