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Rancher Cliven Bundy holds his 5-month-old grandson Roper Cox on Saturday in Bunkerville, Nev. Bundy was hosting an event to mark one year since the Bureau of Land Management's failed attempt to collect his cattle. John Locher/AP hide caption

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John Locher/AP

Around the Nation

Year After Denying Federal Control, Bundy Still Runs His Bit Of Nevada

Rancher Cliven Bundy successfully stood down Bureau of Land Management agents near Las Vegas. He's considered a symbol for a national movement to wrest Western lands from U.S. agencies' authority.

Senate Foreign Relations Committee member Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., questions Secretary of State John Kerry on Capitol Hill last month. In an interview with NPR, Rubio reiterated his opposition to President Obama's dealings with Iran and Cuba. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

Republicans Are Making Foreign Policy The Obamacare Of The 2016 Election

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Rancher Cliven Bundy holds his 5-month-old grandson Roper Cox on Saturday in Bunkerville, Nev. Bundy was hosting an event to mark one year since the Bureau of Land Management's failed attempt to collect his cattle. John Locher/AP hide caption

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John Locher/AP

Year After Denying Federal Control, Bundy Still Runs His Bit Of Nevada

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Diane Gira (left) and Valerie Nelson (right) pose with their son, Madison, in their home near Wahpeton, N.D. Maggie Penman/NPR hide caption

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Maggie Penman/NPR

Church Ceremonies Push North Dakota Town To Grapple With Gay Rights

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Anne Koller closes her eyes as an oncology nurse attaches a line for chemotherapy to a port in her chest. Koller typically spends three to six hours getting each treatment. Sarah Jane Tribble/WCPN hide caption

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Sarah Jane Tribble/WCPN

Shots - Health News

Big Bills A Hidden Side Effect Of Cancer Treatment

3 min

Big Bills A Hidden Side Effect Of Cancer Treatment

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Campaigners marched Monday in Nigeria's capital of Abuja during a silent protest to raise awareness about girls and boys abducted by Boko Haram. Sunday Alamba/AP hide caption

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Sunday Alamba/AP

Goats and Soda

Hundreds Of Nigerian Girls Still Missing A Year After Kidnapping

4 min

Hundreds Of Nigerian Girls Still Missing A Year After Kidnapping

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A protester in front of Sen. Marco Rubio's Doral, Fla., office in 2013 urges Rubio to stop opposing the inclusion of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender families in the Senate's immigration bill. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

It's All Politics

As Country Changes, Rubio And Republicans Try To Adjust

7 min

As Country Changes, Rubio And Republicans Try To Adjust

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Asian music hitmaker Jae Chong, at work in a studio in Seoul. His work is all over Asian charts, but his passport is American. Elise Hu/NPR hide caption

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Elise Hu/NPR

How Asian-Americans Found A Home In The World Of K-Pop

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