Morning Edition for April 15, 2015 Hear the Morning Edition program for April 15, 2015

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ESA/NASA

The Salt

The Space Station Gets A Coffee Bar

Italy is sending a high-tech espresso machine to the International Space Station. And NASA is worried it might be too popular.

Kobus alerted his managers that a supervisor was allowing favorite employees to take time off for their birthdays, so the government had to pay more for other people at the agency to work overtime. "You know, this is not our money. This is the taxpayers' money, and I want it to be correct," he says. Courtesy of Robert Kobus hide caption

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Courtesy of Robert Kobus

Law

A Decade After Blowing The Whistle On The FBI, Vindication

4 min

A Decade After Blowing The Whistle On The FBI, Vindication

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Martha and Alvaro Galvis used to travel from New Hampshire to Boston to watch the marathon every year. Both were hurt in the bombing two years ago. Jesse Costa/WBUR hide caption

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Jesse Costa/WBUR

Shots - Health News

Marathon Bombing Survivors Face A World That Still Feels Out Of Control

3 min

Marathon Bombing Survivors Face A World That Still Feels Out Of Control

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John Wilkes Booth was the son of prominent, wealthy actors. He, too, became an actor and was so popular, he was one of the first to have his clothes ripped off by fans. Hulton Archive/Getty hide caption

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Hulton Archive/Getty

Who Was John Wilkes Booth Before He Became Lincoln's Assassin?

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Joel Heitkamp smiles while broadcasting in 2009 at AM radio station KFGO in Fargo, N.D. Elaine Thompson/AP hide caption

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Elaine Thompson/AP

Radio Connects North Dakota Residents Divided On Gay Rights

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Students take the annual College Scholastic Ability Test, or college entrance exam, at a high school in Seoul last November. Students face enormous pressure to do well on the test and get into a top university. Airplanes are grounded on the day of the test so they won't disturb the students. Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images

The All-Work, No-Play Culture Of South Korean Education

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Texas Rangers relief pitcher Lisalverto Bonilla throws during the fifth inning of a spring training baseball game against the Kansas City Royals on March 4, in Surprise, Ariz. He is scheduled to undergo Tommy John surgery this week. Charlie Riedel/AP hide caption

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Charlie Riedel/AP

As American Sports Skew More Armcentric, Throwing Injuries Rise

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As China continues its massive economic growth, especially in cities, the government continues to severely limit people's rights. Is that system sustainable? Johannes Eisele/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Johannes Eisele/AFP/Getty Images

From Horses To High-Rises: An Insider 'Unmasks' China's Economic Rise

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Workers pick asparagus in early April at Del Bosque Farms in Firebaugh, Calif. This year, some farmers in the state will get water, others won't, based on when their land was first irrigated. David Paul Morris/Bloomberg/Getty Images hide caption

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David Paul Morris/Bloomberg/Getty Images

Redistribute California's Water? Not Without A Fight

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