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Armenian refugees on the deck of the French cruiser that rescued them in 1915 during the massacre of the Armenian populations in the Ottoman Empire. The photo does not specify precisely where the refugees were from. However, residents of Vakifli, the last remaining Armenian village in Turkey, were rescued by a French warship that year. Photo 12/Photo12/UIG/Getty Images hide caption

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Photo 12/Photo12/UIG/Getty Images

Parallels

Last Armenian Village In Turkey Keeps Silent About 1915 Slaughter

The Ottomans killed some 1.5 million Armenians a century ago, and many Armenians are talking about that terrible time as the centennial begins this week. But not the Armenians in one Turkish village.

Rida Sihab Mansour, a staff sergeant in the National Guard, stands with the uniform he wears when he serves on the honor guard at military funerals. He says he's positive that his guard commitments are making it more difficult to build a career. Katie Schoolov/KPBS hide caption

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Katie Schoolov/KPBS

National Guard Members Struggle To Keep Civilian Careers

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Armenian refugees on the deck of the French cruiser that rescued them in 1915 during the massacre of the Armenian populations in the Ottoman Empire. The photo does not specify precisely where the refugees were from. However, residents of Vakifli, the last remaining Armenian village in Turkey, were rescued by a French warship that year. Photo 12/Photo12/UIG/Getty Images hide caption

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Photo 12/Photo12/UIG/Getty Images

Last Armenian Village In Turkey Keeps Silent About 1915 Slaughter

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The King Jacob, a Portuguese-flagged cargo vessel, was the first ship to arrive near the migrant boat that sank off the Libyan coast over the weekend. The boat had been carrying more than 800 people. Alessandro Fucarini/AP hide caption

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Alessandro Fucarini/AP

Merchant Ships Called On To Aid Migrants In Mediterranean Feel The Strain

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In New Hampshire on Tuesday, Hillary Clinton weighed in on the trade deal without taking sides. "Well, any trade deal has to produce jobs and raise wages and increase prosperity and protect our security," she said. Andrew Burton/Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Burton/Getty Images

Renewed Trade Debate Puts Presidential Candidates On The Spot

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"We deserve neither credit nor blame for our ancestors and the degree of interest in this story suggests that we are, as a nation, still grappling with the terrible legacy of slavery," Affleck wrote. John Shearer/AP hide caption

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John Shearer/AP

Ben Affleck (Kinda) Apologizes For Asking PBS Program To Hide Slave-Owning Ancestor

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Decathlon gold medalist Bruce Jenner throws the javelin during an Olympic competition in Montreal on July 30, 1976. AP hide caption

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AP

Bruce Jenner's Long History Of Clearing Hurdles

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Protesters rally after a march for Freddie Gray that ended in front of the Baltimore Police Department's Western District police station Tuesday. Gray, 25, died from spinal injuries on April 19, one week after being arrested. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

'Sliver Of Hope' In Freddie Gray Case, Former Baltimore Police Chief Says

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