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Children aboard this World Airways DC-8 jet were evacuated from Vietnam on April 2, 1975, shortly before the fall of Saigon and just two days before the first official Operation Babylift flight. Among the children was Thanh Jeff Ghar (center, lying by a window), 12. Photo as exhibited at the Presidio's Operation Babylift: Perspectives & Legacies exhibition at the Officers' Club, courtesy of the AP hide caption

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Photo as exhibited at the Presidio's Operation Babylift: Perspectives & Legacies exhibition at the Officers' Club, courtesy of the AP

Back At Base

Two Days Before Operation Babylift, 57 Children Were Evacuated To The U.S.

Days before the fall of Saigon, a plane left Vietnam with 57 children on board. The program intended to bring orphans to the U.S. was controversial, but two who were there say it was right.

Protesters hold a pro-gay-rights flag outside the US Supreme Court on Saturday, countering the demonstrators who attended the March For Marriage in Washington, D.C. The Supreme Court meets on Tuesday to hear arguments over whether same-sex couples have a constitutional right to wed in the United States, with a final decision expected in June. Paul J. Richards/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Paul J. Richards/AFP/Getty Images

Legal Battle Over Gay Marriage Hits The Supreme Court Tuesday

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An artillery gun fires a round at Taliban fighters in the hills of Nangahar Province. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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David Gilkey/NPR

On Its Own, The Afghan Army Takes The Fight To The Taliban

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First Lt. Ashley White was one of some 55 to 60 women selected for cultural support teams that deployed to Afghanistan in 2011. She did not make it home. She was the first woman to die and be honored alongside the Army Rangers with whom she served. Courtesy of the White Family hide caption

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Courtesy of the White Family

'Ashley's War' Details Vital Work Of Female Soldiers In Afghanistan

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Tyson Foods says it has already reduced its use of human-use antibiotics by 80 percent over the past four years. Here, Tyson frozen chicken on display at Piazza's market in Palo Alto, Calif., in 2010. Paul Sakuma/AP hide caption

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Paul Sakuma/AP

Tyson Foods To Stop Giving Chickens Antibiotics Used By Humans

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Children aboard this World Airways DC-8 jet were evacuated from Vietnam on April 2, 1975, shortly before the fall of Saigon and just two days before the first official Operation Babylift flight. Among the children was Thanh Jeff Ghar (center, lying by a window), 12. Photo as exhibited at the Presidio's Operation Babylift: Perspectives & Legacies exhibition at the Officers' Club, courtesy of the AP hide caption

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Photo as exhibited at the Presidio's Operation Babylift: Perspectives & Legacies exhibition at the Officers' Club, courtesy of the AP

Flight Attendant On Saigon Evacuation: You Wanted 'To Help Every Child'

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Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe in Boston on Monday. Dominick Reuter/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Dominick Reuter/AFP/Getty Images

The past haunts the present for Japan's Shinzo Abe

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