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Neil Portnow (left), president and CEO of The Recording Academy, talks with Lee Thomas Miller, head of the Nashville Songwriters Association International, at a music licensing hearing in 2014. Paul Morigi/WireImage for NARAS hide caption

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Paul Morigi/WireImage for NARAS

Music News

Songwriters And Streaming Services Battle Over Decades-Old Decree

The Department of Justice is exploring big changes to the music publishing business for the first time since World War II.

A man walks out of a polling station in St. Leonard's Church on Thursday in Loftus, England. Ian Forsyth/Getty Images hide caption

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Ian Forsyth/Getty Images

Britons Cast Ballots In Tightest Race In Decades

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Gene DeAnna is curator of the National Jukebox project, which is an online collection of more than 10,000 pre-1925 recordings. Brian Naylor/NPR hide caption

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Brian Naylor/NPR

A Long Way From Wax Cylinders, Library Of Congress Slowly Joins The Digital Age

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The remains of an inflatable boat that passed illegally from the coast of Turkey rest in October 2014 on the shore 10 miles from Mytilene, Greece. Thirty-four immigrants from Syria, among them one woman and three children, made a dangerous night journey Sept. 26. Orestis Panagiotou/EPA/LANDOV hide caption

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Orestis Panagiotou/EPA/LANDOV

On Patrol With The Greek Coast Guard, On The Lookout For Migrants

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At Slush Asia, a new tech festival held in Tokyo in late April, the scene and the energy resembled a small-scale South by Southwest Interactive. Elise Hu/NPR hide caption

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Elise Hu/NPR

A Startup Scene That's Not So Hot: Japan's Entrepreneur Shortage

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Neil Portnow (left), president and CEO of The Recording Academy, talks with Lee Thomas Miller, head of the Nashville Songwriters Association International, at a music licensing hearing in 2014. Paul Morigi/WireImage for NARAS hide caption

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Paul Morigi/WireImage for NARAS

Songwriters And Streaming Services Battle Over Decades-Old Decree

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PREPA's Central Palo Seco power station in San Juan, Puerto Rico. The utility's bondholders want to raise rates. That's a challenge when the median income is about half that of Mississippi, yet the U.S. territory's energy costs are among the highest in the nation. Alvin Baez-Hernandez/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Alvin Baez-Hernandez/Reuters/Landov

Power Problems: Puerto Rico's Electric Utility Faces Crippling Debt

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Tom Brady speaks during a press conference in January to address the underinflation of footballs used in the AFC championship game. Maddie Meyer/Getty Images hide caption

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NFL Issues Report On Patriots' Deflategate, Says Brady Probably Knew

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Brig. Gen. Akram Samme coordinates his men at Camp Eagle in the Shah Joy district of Zabul province in southern Afghanistan. He is a commander in the major operation against the Taliban that's currently under way. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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Afghan Army Makes Progress; Will Government Services Follow?

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Ann Allen (right) and Marie Birsic (left) take part in a demonstration to prevent the closure of Lakewood Hospital on Cleveland's West Side. Birsic says the neighborhood will "go down into a ghost town" once the hospital is turned into an outpatient center. Sarah Jane Tribble/WCPN hide caption

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Sarah Jane Tribble/WCPN

Losing A Hospital In The Heart Of A Small City

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