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NASA's RoboSimian is among the robots taking part in the Defense Department competition. The Space Agency may one day use it to explore caves on other planets. Dan Goods/JPL hide caption

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Dan Goods/JPL

The Two-Way

The Pentagon Wants These Robots To Save The Day

A competition in California is trying to ready robots for disaster response. But the bots have a ways to go.

The headquarters of the South American Football Confederation, or CONMEBOL, in Luque, Paraguay. The confederation has the status of an embassy, which includes legal immunity in Paraguay. Two former heads of CONMEBOL have been indicted in the FIFA scandal, accused of taking bribes and money laundering. Norberto Duarte/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Norberto Duarte/AFP/Getty Images

FIFA's Soccer 'Embassy' In Paraguay, Complete With Legal Immunity

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A blood test developed by Harvard researchers checks for evidence of past infection with more than a thousand strains of virus, from about 200 virus families. The swine flu virus shown here, A/CA/4/09, rarely infects humans. C. S. Goldsmith/CDC hide caption

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C. S. Goldsmith/CDC

How Many Viruses Have Infected You?

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Workers use perforating tools to create fractures in rock. An EPA study finds that "fracking" to reach and extract deep pockets of hydrocarbons has not caused widespread drinking water pollution. Brennan Linsley/AP hide caption

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Brennan Linsley/AP

EPA Finds No Widespread Drinking Water Pollution From Fracking

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A poor economy and nine years of recession have caused many to leave Puerto Rico. Margalit Francus/Flickr hide caption

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Margalit Francus/Flickr

Broke And Barred From Bankruptcy, Puerto Rico Seeks Outside Cash

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South Korean school students put on face masks during a special class on the MERS virus at an elementary school in Seoul. Jung Yeon-je/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jung Yeon-je/AFP/Getty Images

South Korea's MERS Crisis Exposes Public Distrust Of Leaders

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Kurt Schmoke, former mayor of Baltimore, is now the president of the University of Baltimore. Courtesy of the University of Baltimore hide caption

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Courtesy of the University of Baltimore

Former Baltimore Mayor: City Must Confront The 'Rot Beneath The Glitter'

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Len Berk slicing salmon at Zabar's food emporium in New York City. Cosima Amelang/StoryCorps hide caption

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Cosima Amelang/StoryCorps

A Life Spent 'Working Toward The Perfect Slice'

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American Pharoah and trainer Bob Baffert at Belmont Park in Elmont, N.Y. American Pharoah will try to become horse racing's first Triple Crown winner since 1978. Seth Wenig/AP hide caption

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Seth Wenig/AP

For Thoroughbreds, The Big Payout Can Come Long After The Race

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NASA's RoboSimian is among the robots taking part in the Defense Department competition. The Space Agency may one day use it to explore caves on other planets. Dan Goods/JPL hide caption

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Dan Goods/JPL

The Pentagon Wants These Robots To Save The Day

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