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Inmates at California's Chino State Prison exercise in the prison yard in 2010. A proposition that was passed in the state last year reclassified certain crimes, releasing thousands of inmates earlier than had been anticipated. Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images hide caption

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Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images

Law

Is It Possible To Let More People Out Of Prison, And Keep Crime Down?

California is trying to do just that, though police and advocates for ex-offenders are at odds over whether it will work. The debate is playing out as President Obama is calling for nationwide change.

Inmates at California's Chino State Prison exercise in the prison yard in 2010. A proposition that was passed in the state last year reclassified certain crimes, releasing thousands of inmates earlier than had been anticipated. Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images hide caption

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Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images

Is It Possible To Let More People Out Of Prison, And Keep Crime Down?

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This screen grab of video from a security camera, dated July 11 and released by Mexico's National Security Commission, shows the man Mexican authorities say is Guzman inside his cell at the Altiplano maximum security prison, looking at the shower floor shortly before escaping through a tunnel below. AP hide caption

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AP

A Visit To El Chapo's Prison Cell (Now That He's Gone)

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Saeed al-Batal, a Syrian photographer, posted this image from Douma, Syria, on his Facebook page on March 31. Courtesy of Saeed al-Batal hide caption

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Courtesy of Saeed al-Batal

The View From Inside Syria

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Designer Thom Browne says he usually shows his men's collections in Paris, but he felt it was important to support the first Fashion Week for men in New York. Jacki Lyden hide caption

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Jacki Lyden

Men Strut Their Stuff At Their Very Own New York Fashion Week

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Harry Kroto, pictured in 1996, displays a model of the geodesic-shaped carbon molecules that he helped discover. Michael Scates/AP hide caption

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Michael Scates/AP

'Buckyballs' Solve Century-Old Mystery About Interstellar Space

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Alan Oates was exposed to herbicides, such as Agent Orange, while serving in Vietnam in 1968. Decades after returning home, he was diagnosed with Parkinson's disease, and because Congress passed the Agent Orange Act, he's able to receive VA benefits. Courtesy of Alan Oates hide caption

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Courtesy of Alan Oates

Can The Agent Orange Act Help Veterans Exposed To Mustard Gas?

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Ioanna Mattke holds Raven, one of six hens that her family owns. The Mattkes have raised Raven since she was a day old. Jason Beaubien/NPR hide caption

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Jason Beaubien/NPR

Chicken Owners Brood Over CDC Advice Not To Kiss, Cuddle Birds

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Cottage cheese peaked in the early 1970s, when the average American ate about 5 pounds of it per year, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

The Fall Of A Dairy Darling: How Cottage Cheese Got Eclipsed By Yogurt

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