Morning Edition for August 25, 2015 Hear the Morning Edition program for August 25, 2015

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Johnny Jackson looks out the back door of his home as he talks to his neighbors in New Orleans. Jackson's home is still under construction 10 years after Hurricane Katrina nearly destroyed his property. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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David Gilkey/NPR

Hurricane Katrina: 10 Years Of Recovery And Reflection

At A Shelter Of Last Resort, Decency Prevailed Over Depravity

Ten years ago, 25,000 people huddled inside the Morial Convention Center in New Orleans seeking shelter from Hurricane Katrina. The fiasco there came to epitomize the chaotic, inadequate response.

A trader fills orders Monday in the Standard & Poor's 500 stock index options pit at the Chicago Board Options Exchange. Watching market numbers plummet can make investors queasy, but analysts say keeping a level head through volatility is the best course. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

Keep Calm And Carry The 1: Investors Often Miscalculate Amid Volatility

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Yo La Tengo plays the music you hear between Morning Edition stories in Studio 1. Lani Milton/NPR hide caption

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Lani Milton/NPR

Yo La Tengo: Morning Edition's In-House Band For A Day

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Almost everyone who owns a home in the city of Petropolis — where the Brazilian royal family once had a summer palace — still pays tax to the descendants of the former rulers. Amadeu Júnior via Flickr hide caption

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Amadeu Júnior via Flickr

For Brazil's 1 Percenters, The Land Stays In The Family Forever

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Last October, a 15-year-old student and member of the Tulalip Tribes in Washington opened fire at his high school with a gun obtained from his father. The tribe had issued a restraining order against the father, but that information didn't show up in the federal criminal database — so he was able to buy the gun. Ted S. Warren/AP hide caption

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Ted S. Warren/AP

Crime Program Aims To Close Trust Gap Between Government, Tribes

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Ira Kaplan (left) and James McNew of Yo La Tengo in NPR's New York City studios. Mike Katzif/NPR hide caption

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Mike Katzif/NPR

Yo La Tengo: 'When We Let The World In, It Can Be So Profound'

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Johnny Jackson looks out the back door of his home as he talks to his neighbors in New Orleans. Jackson's home is still under construction 10 years after Hurricane Katrina nearly destroyed his property. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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David Gilkey/NPR

At A Shelter Of Last Resort, Decency Prevailed Over Depravity

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