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Climate scientists who scrutinized the U.N. accord are urging citizens to keep a sharp eye on each nation's leaders to make sure they follow through on pledges to reduce emissions. Simone Golob/Corbis hide caption

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Simone Golob/Corbis

Heating Up

Scientists See U.N. Climate Accord As A Good Start, But Just A Start

Many analyzing the deal hammered out in Paris say it's way better than no plan at all. But proof, they warn, will be in the execution of efforts to cap global temperature rise at 2 degrees C or less.

Ambulances lined up following two explosions near the finish line of the Boston Marathon on April 15, 2013. Aram Boghosian for The Boston Globe via Getty Images hide caption

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Aram Boghosian for The Boston Globe via Getty Images

Looking At Violence In America With A Financial Lens

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Jingle Bells Minions
PX-41 Labs
More Stars Than There Are in Heaven Yo La Tengo
Christmas Time Is Here [Intrumental - Album Version] Vince Guaraldi Trio
A Mad Russian's Christmas [Instrumental] Trans-Siberian Orchestra

Climate scientists who scrutinized the U.N. accord are urging citizens to keep a sharp eye on each nation's leaders to make sure they follow through on pledges to reduce emissions. Simone Golob/Corbis hide caption

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Simone Golob/Corbis

Scientists See U.N. Climate Accord As A Good Start, But Just A Start

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Days of Wine and Roses The Verve Jazz Ensemble
Baby Elephant Walk 101 Strings
Crazy Quilt Kevin Hays & Brad Mehldau

De Desharnais, a homebuilder and real estate agent in Nashua, N.H., stands in front of a house her company is constructing. She says her company had 32 employees at the height of the housing boom, and now only has six despite the industry's gradual recovery. Chris Arnold/NPR hide caption

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Chris Arnold/NPR

Will A Fed Interest Rate Hike Slow The Housing Recovery?

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The Dope Pope Adam Larson
Sh*tpay Adam Larson
Borders [Explicit] M.I.A.
The Cousin of Death The Beastie Boys
Crescent Nomo
Patterns NOMO
Chrysalis Keith Davis Trio

Martha Lucia (from left), Bienvendida Barreno and Jorge Baquero discuss health insurance options with agents from Sunshine Life and Health Advisors at a Miami mall last month. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Obamacare Sign-Ups Could Get A Bump As Higher Penalties Kick In

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Big Bang Theory Theme Barenaked Ladies
33 Last Lungs
Vegas Nicholas Britell
Ride or Die The Budos Band
I Heard You Looking Yo La Tengo

After recent terrorist attacks, social media companies are under pressure to do more to stop messaging from terrorist groups. Patrick George/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Patrick George/Ikon Images/Getty Images

What Can — Or Should — Internet Companies Do To Fight Terrorism?

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Preservation Think Differently
Slow Blues Think Differently
Foggy Mountain Break Down Arizona Smoke Revue

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