Morning Edition for December 29, 2015 Hear the Morning Edition program for December 29, 2015

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Kendrick Lamar onstage at Brooklyn's Barclays Center in October. Bennett Raglin/Getty Images hide caption

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Bennett Raglin/Getty Images

Music Interviews

Kendrick Lamar: 'I Can't Change The World Until I Change Myself First'

Even with To Pimp A Butterfly's success, Lamar is still conflicted about his place in music. "How am I influencing so many people on this stage rather than influencing the ones that I have back home?"

Seanne Thomas manages three health insurance plans for people in her family. Mark Zdechlik/MPR hide caption

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Mark Zdechlik/MPR

Shots - Health News

Do You Speak Health Insurance? It's Not Easy

4 min

Do You Speak Health Insurance? It's Not Easy

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Reporting from a Seoul cat cafe, one of the many themed cafes in Japan and Korea. Haeryun Kang/for NPR hide caption

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Haeryun Kang/for NPR

Parallels

Reporter's Notebook: Settling In In Seoul

2 min

Reporter's Notebook: Settling In In Seoul

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A U.S. Coast Guard crew (foreground) with six Cubans who were picked up in the Florida Straits in May. A larger Coast Guard vessel is in the background. The number of Cubans trying to reach the U.S. has soared in the past year. Many Cubans believe it will be more difficult to enter the U.S. as relations improve, though U.S. officials say there will be no rule changes in the near term. Tony Winton/AP hide caption

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Tony Winton/AP

Cuban Immigrants Flow Into The U.S., Fearing The Rules Will Change

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Kendrick Lamar onstage at Brooklyn's Barclays Center in October. Bennett Raglin/Getty Images hide caption

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Bennett Raglin/Getty Images

Kendrick Lamar: 'I Can't Change The World Until I Change Myself First'

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The Weeknd in the video for "I Can't Feel My Face." Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Courtesy of the artist

DJ Earworm's Year-End Mashup Hits A Nostalgic Groove

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Clockwise from top left: General Mills, Nestle, Dunkin Donuts, Panera, Tyson Chicken and McDonald's, among other big food companies, made commitments in 2015 to change the way they prepare and procure their food products. Daniel Acker/Bloomberg/Getty; Justin Sullivan/Getty; Susana Gonzalez/Bloomberg/Getty; Daniel Acker/Bloomberg/Getty; Paul Sakuma/AP; Ulrich Baumgarten/Getty hide caption

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Daniel Acker/Bloomberg/Getty; Justin Sullivan/Getty; Susana Gonzalez/Bloomberg/Getty; Daniel Acker/Bloomberg/Getty; Paul Sakuma/AP; Ulrich Baumgarten/Getty

The Salt

The Year In Food: Artificial Out, Innovation In (And 2 More Trends)

3 min

The Year In Food: Artificial Out, Innovation In (And 2 More Trends)

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