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Passengers travel on one of the ferries that cut across Havana Bay from Casablanca to Old Havana in July 2015. While the Obama administration has approved licenses to companies that want to offer services to Miami, the plans are still controversial on both sides. Ramon Espinosa/AP hide caption

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Ramon Espinosa/AP

Around the Nation

Plan For Cuba Ferry Terminal Reveals Shift In Miami Politics

Miami-Dade County is considering building a ferry terminal that would serve carriers offering regular service to Cuba. It's a sign that in a city that's home to Cuban exiles, times have changed.

Emmanuel Kwame, 60, lost his sight to river blindness as a young man. He lives in Asubende, Ghana, earning a living as a farmer and fisherman. Jason Beaubien/NPR hide caption

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Jason Beaubien/NPR

The Farmer And Fisherman Who Lost His Sight To River Blindness

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Guinea is where the Ebola outbreak started in West Africa. In this photo from November 2014, workers from the local Red Cross prepare to bury people who died of the virus. Kenzo Tribouillard /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Kenzo Tribouillard /AFP/Getty Images

5 Mysteries About Ebola: From Bats To Eyeballs To Blood

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French soldiers guard access to a Jewish school in Marseille a day after a teenager wielding a butcher knife wounded a teacher. Boris Horvat/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Boris Horvat/AFP/Getty Images

After Attack, An Uproar Over A Call For French Jews To Quit Wearing Yarmulkes

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Passengers travel on one of the ferries that cut across Havana Bay from Casablanca to Old Havana in July 2015. While the Obama administration has approved licenses to companies that want to offer services to Miami, the plans are still controversial on both sides. Ramon Espinosa/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Ramon Espinosa/AP

Plan For Cuba Ferry Terminal Reveals Shift In Miami Politics

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