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Director of the National Intelligence James Clapper, seated at the table meets with the Senate Intelligence Committee Feb. 9, including Chairman Richard Burr, R-N.C. Burr and the committee's minority leader, Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., are working on a bill that would force companies like Apple to help prosecutors unlock the phones of criminal suspects. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

All Tech Considered

In Apple-FBI Fight, Congress Considers Aggressive And Measured Approaches

National security hawks want a bill that would order tech companies to open phones for law enforcement; other legislators think a panel should dig into the subject and make recommendations first.

CSIRO's Australia Telescope Compact Array at the Paul Wild Observatory. Alex Cherney hide caption

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Alex Cherney

In A Far-Off Galaxy, A Clue To What's Causing Strange Bursts Of Radio Waves

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Each year, between 8,000 and 9,000 people nationwide complain to the government about nursing home evictions, according to federal data. That makes evictions the leading category of all nursing home complaints. shapecharge/Getty Images hide caption

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shapecharge/Getty Images

Nursing Home Evictions Strand The Disabled In Costly Hospitals

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Marcia Andrade, an agent from Brazil's Ministry of Health, interviews Camila Alves, 22. A friend holds Alves' 2-month-old daughter. Catherine Osborn for NPR hide caption

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Catherine Osborn for NPR

Disease Detectives In Brazil Go Door-To-Door To Solve Zika Mystery

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Muhammad Ali, world heavyweight boxing champion, stands with Malcolm X (left) outside the Trans-Lux Newsreel Theater in New York in 1964. AP hide caption

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AP

Muhammad Ali And Malcolm X: A Broken Friendship, An Enduring Legacy

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A New York judge has ruled that items like Panera's Bacon Turkey Bravo Sandwich on Tomato Basil bread, which contains 2,850 milligrams of sodium, require a warning label. Jesse Grant/Getty Images for IMG hide caption

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Jesse Grant/Getty Images for IMG

Judge Rules NYC Can Require Sodium Warnings On Restaurant Menus

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Director of the National Intelligence James Clapper, seated at the table meets with the Senate Intelligence Committee Feb. 9, including Chairman Richard Burr, R-N.C. Burr and the committee's minority leader, Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., are working on a bill that would force companies like Apple to help prosecutors unlock the phones of criminal suspects. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

In Apple-FBI Fight, Congress Considers Aggressive And Measured Approaches

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Iranians in Qom walk past electoral posters on Wednesday. Parliamentary elections are being held in Iran on Friday. Few people in Qom believe more engagement with the West is a good idea. Atta Kenare/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Atta Kenare/AFP/Getty Images

In Iran's Religious Heartland, An Enduring Distrust Of The U.S.

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