Morning Edition for February 26, 2016 Hear the Morning Edition program for February 26, 2016

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Marley Dias Andrea Cipriani Mecchi hide caption

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Andrea Cipriani Mecchi

NPR Ed

Where's The Color In Kids' Lit? Ask The Girl With 1,000 Books (And Counting)

Eleven-year-old Marley Dias went on a quest to collect and donate 1,000 books with a black girl as the main character. Spoiler alert: She did really well.

This bag contains about as much caffeine as a thousand cups of coffee. Morgan McCloy/NPR hide caption

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Morgan McCloy/NPR

Caffeine For Sale: The Hidden Trade Of The World's Favorite Stimulant

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Migrants and refugees seeking asylum in Sarstedt, Germany, line up Feb. 26 for lunch at the shelter where they live while their asylum applications are processed. Germany wants to send more migrants home and sent a charter plane filled with Afghan migrants back to Kabul on Wednesday. Alexander Koerner /Getty Images hide caption

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Alexander Koerner /Getty Images

Discouraged By Delays In Germany, Some Migrants Opt To Return Home

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Neel Sethi plays Mowgli in the upcoming film adaptation of Rudyard Kipling's The Jungle Book. During filming, Neel worked with studio teacher Lois Yaroshefsky to get at least three hours of school in every day, as the law requires. Disney hide caption

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Disney

Directors Know: When Child Actors Are On Set, The Studio Teacher Is In Charge

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San Bernardino Chief of Police Jarrod Burguan says the search of the iPhone used by one of the shooters is "an effort to leave no stone unturned" in the investigation of the Dec. 2 terrorist attack. Robert Gauthier/LA Times/Getty Images hide caption

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Robert Gauthier/LA Times/Getty Images

San Bernardino Police Chief Sees Chance Nothing Of Value On Shooter's iPhone

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Willie Harris and Alex Brown, photographed in Stockton, Calif. Luisa Conlon for StoryCorps hide caption

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Luisa Conlon for StoryCorps

For 2 Black Stuntmen Breaking Into Hollywood, 'You Were Subject To Get Hurt'

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