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The pastor of Fort Des Moines Church of Christ in Des Moines, Iowa, says Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump is "morally loathsome." Sarah McCammon/NPR hide caption

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Sarah McCammon/NPR

Politics

Many Evangelicals Are In 'An Awkward Place' With Trump Atop GOP

Donald Trump's popularity with self-described evangelical Christians fades among those who attend church regularly. "The true evangelical," says an Iowa pastor, is in "a quandary, a dilemma."

"Some days I wake up and go, 'Am I wasting time, when I could be on chemotherapy or getting a surgery?' " asks Tony Lapinski, a Montana veteran who worries about what is causing his severe back pain. Michael Albans for NPR hide caption

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Michael Albans for NPR

Shots - Health News

Despite $10B 'Fix,' Veterans Are Waiting Even Longer To See Doctors

10 min

Despite $10B 'Fix,' Veterans Are Waiting Even Longer To See Doctors

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The pastor of Fort Des Moines Church of Christ in Des Moines, Iowa, says Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump is "morally loathsome." Sarah McCammon/NPR hide caption

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Sarah McCammon/NPR

Many Evangelicals Are In 'An Awkward Place' With Trump Atop GOP

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Mendez stands in his bedroom recording studio. Emily Bogle/NPR hide caption

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Emily Bogle/NPR

How The Narrator Of 'Jane The Virgin' Found His Voice

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Former Florida Sen. Bob Graham, shown here in 2012, has urged the Obama administration to release the 28 pages of a congressional inquiry into the Sept. 11 attacks that have remained classified. Graham and others say this material contains important information about the financing of the terrorists and their Saudi connections. Phil Sandlin/AP hide caption

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Phil Sandlin/AP

The Renewed Sept. 11 Debate Over The 'Missing 28 Pages' And Saudi Arabia

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Kelli Glenn holds a photo of her father while he was in the hospital. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR

Shots - Health News

Suddenly Paralyzed, 2 Men Struggle To Recover From Guillain-Barre

6 min

Suddenly Paralyzed, 2 Men Struggle To Recover From Guillain-Barre

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