Morning Edition for May 17, 2016 Hear the Morning Edition program for May 17, 2016

Morning EditionMorning Edition

Libyans are wary, but are enjoying a bit of normalcy at the new cafes that have sprung up in the past few months. Mahmud Turkia/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Mahmud Turkia/AFP/Getty Images

The Salt

In The Midst Of Libya's Turmoil, New Cafes Spring Up To 'Change The Mood'

Logically, it's not the right time to open up shop in Tripoli. But entrepreneurs aren't only investing in their businesses, they're buying into a new way of life.

Navy veteran Amanda Wirtz looks through her correspondence with the Veterans Choice program. After the VA couldn't get her an appointment with a specialist, it sent her to the Choice program. But she still was unable to get an appointment for several months. Courtesy of KPBS hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of KPBS

How Congress And The VA Left Many Veterans Without A 'Choice'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/478215589/478337182" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Bassist Jane Little performed with the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra for more than 71 years — a world record. Dustin Chambers/Atlanta Symphony Orchestra hide caption

toggle caption
Dustin Chambers/Atlanta Symphony Orchestra

Jane Little, Atlanta's Dainty Double-Bass Player For 71 Years, Dies Onstage

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/478337126/478337127" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

In some parts of the country, this might require bug spray. Steven Errico/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Steven Errico/Getty Images

Who Should Be Worried About Zika And What Should They Do?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/478251289/478337188" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

SignAloud gloves translate sign language into text and speech. Conrado Tapado/Univ of Washington, CoMotion hide caption

toggle caption
Conrado Tapado/Univ of Washington, CoMotion

These Gloves Offer A Modern Twist On Sign Language

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/478244421/478337194" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Ron Nielsen, a retired airline pilot, tells his class of fearful fliers in Southern California that crying can be a useful emotional release. If that's what they need to do, he tells them, "let 'er rip!" Courtesy of Air Hollywood hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Air Hollywood

Hollywood Jet Gives Fearful Fliers The Courage To Soar

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/478234178/478337200" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Libyans are wary, but are enjoying a bit of normalcy at the new cafes that have sprung up in the past few months. Mahmud Turkia/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Mahmud Turkia/AFP/Getty Images

In The Midst Of Libya's Turmoil, New Cafes Spring Up To 'Change The Mood'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/478249531/478337212" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Searching for a song you heard between stories? We've retired music buttons on these pages. Learn more here.

Morning EditionMorning Edition