Morning Edition for August 22, 2016 Hear the Morning Edition program for August 22, 2016

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In 2014, about 2,300 people in Seoul made 250 tons of kimchi, a traditional fermented South Korean pungent vegetable dish, to donate to neighbors in preparation for winter. Ahn Young-joon/AP hide caption

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Ahn Young-joon/AP

The Salt

How South Korea Uses Kimchi To Connect To The World — And Beyond

The traditional dish is so essential to the nation's culture and identity that the government promotes it globally in an effort to foster understanding and peace among countries.

Amber Lakin (front) and colleague Julia Porras work at Central City Concern, an organization that does outreach and job training to combat homelessness and addiction in Portland, Ore. Lakin went through the welfare system and now works with Central City Coffee, an offshoot of the main organization, which uses coffee roasting/packaging as a job training space. Leah Nash for NPR hide caption

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Leah Nash for NPR

National

20 Years Since Welfare's Overhaul, Results Are Mixed

7 min

20 Years Since Welfare's Overhaul, Results Are Mixed

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In 2014, about 2,300 people in Seoul made 250 tons of kimchi, a traditional fermented South Korean pungent vegetable dish, to donate to neighbors in preparation for winter. Ahn Young-joon/AP hide caption

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Ahn Young-joon/AP

How South Korea Uses Kimchi To Connect To The World — And Beyond

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Analysis

Politics In The News

7 min

Politics In The News

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At Six Flags Magic Mountain in Valencia, Calif., riders of the New Revolution Virtual Reality Coaster wear VR goggles to play a video game while the roller coaster twists and turns. Courtesy of Six Flags hide caption

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Courtesy of Six Flags

All Tech Considered

On Six Flags' Virtual Reality Coaster, The Ride Is Just Half The Thrill

3 min

On Six Flags' Virtual Reality Coaster, The Ride Is Just Half The Thrill

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