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A rocket carrying the OSIRIS-REx spacecraft lifts off at the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida on Thursday. The spacecraft aims to collect samples from the asteroid Bennu. John Raoux/AP hide caption

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John Raoux/AP

The Two-Way

NASA Mission To Retrieve Ancient Asteroid Dust Is Ready For Launch

The mission aims to circle a hill-sized asteroid for two years, then skim its surface and bring a hearty sample of 4.5 billion-year-old dirt back to Earth.

A U.S. Predator drone sits on the tarmac at the Kandahar military airport in southern Afghanistan in 2010. The U.S. has been using drones more and more frequently since the Sept. 11 attacks. They have been highly effective on the battlefield, but have raised legal and ethical issues. Massoud Hossaini /AP hide caption

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Massoud Hossaini /AP

The Rise Of The Drone, And The Thorny Questions That Have Followed

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A rocket carrying the OSIRIS-REx spacecraft lifts off at the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida on Thursday. The spacecraft aims to collect samples from the asteroid Bennu. John Raoux/AP hide caption

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John Raoux/AP

NASA Launches Mission To Retrieve Ancient Asteroid Dust

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George Takei predicted Star Trek would be too sophisticated to last — but he says he's happy to have been proved wrong. The Kobal Collection/Paramount Television hide caption

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The Kobal Collection/Paramount Television

Much More Than A 5-Year Mission: 'Star Trek' Turns 50

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A relaxed, undrugged dog patiently waits its turn in the MRI scanner. The scientists' trick: Make it seem fun. Enikő Kubinyi/Science hide caption

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Enikő Kubinyi/Science

How A Dog In An MRI Scanner Is Like Your Grandma At A Disco

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