Morning Edition for January 10, 2017 Hear the Morning Edition program for January 10, 2017

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President Obama, seen on his way to board Air Force One, will deliver his farewell address on Tuesday night in Chicago. Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Politics

Obama's Farewell Address: How Presidents Use This Moment Of Reflection

On Tuesday, President Obama will follow a tradition dating back to George Washington. Over the years, presidents have offered warnings about partisanship, praised balance of power and shared regrets.

Eduardo walks by the spot where he was arrested for selling cocaine when he was 17 in New York City. He was recently pardoned by New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo as part of a program that helps people who committed a nonviolent crime when they were 16 or 17 and have stayed conviction-free for at least 10 years. Hansi Lo Wang/NPR hide caption

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Hansi Lo Wang/NPR

After Teenage Mistakes, Pardons Give Second Chances To Ex-Offenders

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Morning Tremor Affelaye
Whir Affelaye
Uno Madlib
I Got Lost Dinosaur Jr.
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What Happened J Mascis
Clemson Tigers Fight Song Clemson University Marching Band
Counting Stars Nujabes
Latitude (Remix) Nujabes feat. Five Deez

HUD Secretary Julian Castro hopes his likely successor, retired neurosurgeon Ben Carson, will come to support many of HUD's programs, but worries whether he'll roll back a new fair housing rule. Ariel Zambelich/NPR hide caption

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Ariel Zambelich/NPR

HUD's Castro Worries That Housing Rule Could Be Rolled Back

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Did They Ever Tell Cousteau? E.S.T.
In My Garage E.S.T.

Sudanese-American singer Alsarah brought her band, The Nubatones, to globalFEST this past Sunday in New York City. Kevin Yatarola/globalFEST hide caption

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Kevin Yatarola/globalFEST

Amid Political Change, A World Music Festival Reaffirms Its Mission

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Alegria Batida
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U'Huh Sinkane
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Life & Livin' It
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President Obama, seen on his way to board Air Force One, will deliver his farewell address on Tuesday night in Chicago. Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images

Obama's Farewell Address: How Presidents Use This Moment Of Reflection

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Colorado Matt Jorgensen
August Matt Jorgensen
Askim Kamasi Washington
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Journey Through Time The Shaolin Afronauts

Attorney General nominee Sen. Jeff Sessions, R-Ala., attends a meeting on Capitol Hill in November 2016. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Wilson/Getty Images

5 Things To Watch For In Jeff Sessions' Attorney General Hearings

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Midroll 3nd
Natsu Owaru 3nd
Ghost Dance LITE

Instead of cars terrorizing people, one researcher is asking whether people might be terrorizing self-driving cars. Noah Berger/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Noah Berger/AFP/Getty Images

Humans Worry About Self-Driving Cars. Maybe It Should Be The Reverse

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Morning Flats Lymbyc Systym
Paraboloid Lymbyc Systym
Emersion Lamplighter

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