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A new Florida state law allows parents, and any residents, to challenge the use of textbooks and instructional materials they find objectionable via an independent hearing. Gulfiya Mukhamatdinova/Getty Images hide caption

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Gulfiya Mukhamatdinova/Getty Images

Education

New Florida Law Lets Residents Challenge School Textbooks

The new bill was pushed by a conservative group critical of the way evolution, climate change and government were being taught in Florida schools.

An international team of scientists analyzed data from men around the world and found sperm counts declining in Western countries. Hanna Barczyk for NPR hide caption

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Hanna Barczyk for NPR

Shots - Health News

Sperm Counts Plummet In Western Men, Study Finds

2 min

Sperm Counts Plummet In Western Men, Study Finds

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Girls are much less likely to be diagnosed with autism, but that may be because the signs of the disorder can be less obvious than in boys. And girls may be missing out on help as a result. Sara Wong for NPR hide caption

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Sara Wong for NPR

Shots - Health News

'Social Camouflage' May Lead To Underdiagnosis Of Autism In Girls

4 min

'Social Camouflage' May Lead To Underdiagnosis Of Autism In Girls

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Kim Hak-min, 30, is an electrical engineering student at Sogang University who fixes iPhones as a side business. Elise Hu/NPR hide caption

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Elise Hu/NPR

How Steve Jobs Helped This North Korean Defector 'Think Different'

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Sasheer Zamata performs at the Just For Laughs festival in Montreal. Joseph Fuda/Just For Laughs hide caption

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Joseph Fuda/Just For Laughs

Performing Arts

Sasheer Zamata Uses Comedy To Address Intolerance

5 min

Sasheer Zamata Uses Comedy To Address Intolerance

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Sen. Jeff Flake, R-Ariz., (center) attends a luncheon with other GOP senators and President Trump on July 19 at the White House. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

Sen. Jeff Flake: 'As Conservatives, Our First Obligation Is To Be Honest'

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A new Florida state law allows parents, and any residents, to challenge the use of textbooks and instructional materials they find objectionable via an independent hearing. Gulfiya Mukhamatdinova/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Gulfiya Mukhamatdinova/Getty Images

New Florida Law Lets Residents Challenge School Textbooks

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/540041860/540515412" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

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