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An NPR investigation finds that people with intellectual disabilities suffer one of the highest rates of sexual assault — and that compared with other rape victims, they are even more likely to be assaulted by someone they know. Cornelia Li for NPR hide caption

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Cornelia Li for NPR

Abused And Betrayed

From The Frontlines Of A Sexual Assault Epidemic: Two Therapists Share Stories

Two psychologists both have a rare specialty: counseling sexual assault survivors who have intellectual disabilities. The stories of sexual violence in their clients' lives have striking similarities.

Wes Studi, pictured here in 2014, says he got into acting through community theater. Charley Gallay/Getty Images for Disney hide caption

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Charley Gallay/Getty Images for Disney

Wes Studi On His Cherokee Nation Childhood And How He Discovered Acting

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Americans give President Trump relatively positive marks on his handling of ISIS and the state of the economy. Olivier Douliery/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Olivier Douliery/Pool/Getty Images

Majority Of Americans See Trump's First Year As A Failure

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An NPR investigation finds that people with intellectual disabilities suffer one of the highest rates of sexual assault — and that compared with other rape victims, they are even more likely to be assaulted by someone they know. Cornelia Li for NPR hide caption

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Cornelia Li for NPR

From The Frontlines Of A Sexual Assault Epidemic: 2 Therapists Share Stories

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Ronda Goldfein, attorney and executive director of the AIDS Law Project of Pennsylvania, holds an envelope that revealed a person's HIV status through the clear window. Elana Gordon/WHYY hide caption

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Elana Gordon/WHYY

Aetna Agrees To Pay $17 Million In HIV Privacy Breach

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