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Jasper Johns, pictured in his New York City studio in 1964, was known for transforming common objects like flags, numerals and archery targets into unsettling paintings. Bob Adelman/© Bob Adelman Estate hide caption

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Bob Adelman/© Bob Adelman Estate

Fine Art

The Flag Still Flies For Jasper Johns

As a major retrospective in Los Angeles shows, the modern American artist got us to take a second look at even common objects like numerals, archery targets and, yes, flags.

Olanda Smith (left) and Dinah McCaryer were the first to marry in Jefferson County on Monday, Feb. 9, 2015, after a federal judge overturned the state's ban on same-sex marriage. Several other counties refused to issue marriage licenses that day. Hal Yeager/AP hide caption

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Hal Yeager/AP

Same-Sex-Marriage Flashpoint: Alabama Considers Quitting The Marriage Business

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Jasper Johns, pictured in his New York City studio in 1964, was known for transforming common objects like flags, numerals and archery targets into unsettling paintings. Bob Adelman/© Bob Adelman Estate hide caption

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Bob Adelman/© Bob Adelman Estate

The Flag Still Flies For Jasper Johns

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Stephen Poloz, governor of the Bank of Canada, from left, Patty Hajdu, Canada's status of women minister, William "Bill" Morneau, Canada's finance minister, and Wanda Robson, sister of Viola Desmond, reveal a photograph of Desmond on stage during an event in Gatineau, Quebec, Canada, on Thursday, Dec. 8, 2016. Chris Roussakis/Bloomberg/ Getty Images hide caption

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Chris Roussakis/Bloomberg/ Getty Images

Canadian Civil Rights Pioneer Will Appear On Country's $10 Bill

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