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A 1996 law sits at the heart of a major question about the modern Internet: How much responsibility should fall to online platforms for how their users act and get treated? Oivind Hovland/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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Oivind Hovland/Getty Images/Ikon Images

All Tech Considered

Section 230: A Key Legal Shield For Facebook, Google Is About To Change

The 1996 law is praised by the tech industry as the core pillar of Internet freedom. But its path also runs through some of the darkest corners of the Web, such as online sex trafficking of children.

Forest On The Sun Thrupence
Rinse Repeat Thrupence
Pastel DJ Ezasscul

A 1996 law sits at the heart of a major question about the modern Internet: How much responsibility should fall to online platforms for how their users act and get treated? Oivind Hovland/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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Oivind Hovland/Getty Images/Ikon Images

Section 230: A Key Legal Shield For Facebook, Google Is About To Change

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Rings of Saturn Klimeks
Creamfields Klimeks
Fog The Flashbulb
Prism The Flashbulb
Forever Only Arms and Sleepers
Desire Kamasi Washington
Truth Kamasi Washington

Trump And NDAs

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Wheels on the Bus (Instrumental Baby Lullaby) Steven Current
Afternoon Youth Lagoon
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Detainees stand in a hall at a detention center for migrants in Al Kararim, Libya. The North African country is a key transit spot and destination for migrants seeking employment or a path to Europe. Manu Brabo/AP hide caption

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Manu Brabo/AP

Migrants Captured In Libya Say They End Up Sold As Slaves

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Into the Stratosphere Yppah and Josef Peters
Submotion Yppah and Josef Peters
Remind Me (Nujabes Tribute) Side Effekt
Distant Worlds Marcus D
Night On the Town Marcus D
Vibin' Evil Needle feat. Freddie Joachim
Good Times Evil Needle feat. Octavio N. Santos
Patience Suduaya
Rose's Thorn TOKiMONSTA
Emersion Lamplighter

In the April issue of National Geographic, the four letters that represent the genetic code — A, C, G and T — are projected onto Ryan Lingarmillar, a Ugandan. Robin Hammond /National Geographic hide caption

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Robin Hammond /National Geographic

'National Geographic' Turns The Lens On Its Own Racist History

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