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A 1996 law sits at the heart of a major question about the modern Internet: How much responsibility should fall to online platforms for how their users act and get treated? Oivind Hovland/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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Oivind Hovland/Getty Images/Ikon Images

All Tech Considered

Section 230: A Key Legal Shield For Facebook, Google Is About To Change

The 1996 law is praised by the tech industry as the core pillar of Internet freedom. But its path also runs through some of the darkest corners of the Web, such as online sex trafficking of children.

A 1996 law sits at the heart of a major question about the modern Internet: How much responsibility should fall to online platforms for how their users act and get treated? Oivind Hovland/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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Oivind Hovland/Getty Images/Ikon Images

Section 230: A Key Legal Shield For Facebook, Google Is About To Change

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Trump And NDAs

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Detainees stand in a hall at a detention center for migrants in Al Kararim, Libya. The North African country is a key transit spot and destination for migrants seeking employment or a path to Europe. Manu Brabo/AP hide caption

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Manu Brabo/AP

Migrants Captured In Libya Say They End Up Sold As Slaves

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In the April issue of National Geographic, the four letters that represent the genetic code — A, C, G and T — are projected onto Ryan Lingarmillar, a Ugandan. Robin Hammond /National Geographic hide caption

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Robin Hammond /National Geographic

'National Geographic' Turns The Lens On Its Own Racist History

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