Morning Edition for September 12, 2018 Hear the Morning Edition program for September 12, 2018

Third graders on board a floating school in Bangladesh run by the nonprofit group Shidhulai Swanirvar Sangstha. Mahmud Hossain Opu for NPR hide caption

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Mahmud Hossain Opu for NPR

Goats and Soda

'Floating Schools' Make Sure Kids Get To Class When The Water Rises

Monsoon floods won't stop these kids from going to school in Bangladesh — especially if the school comes to the student!

Tokyo Sound Tribe Sector 9
Flight [Mungo's Hi Fi Remix] Hidden Orchestra
Maribel Oskar Schuster
Lettsanity Lettuce
Force Lettuce

An Apple-1 circuit board is rigged up to a vintage keyboard and monitor. The board is one of only 200 manufactured in 1976. RR Auction hide caption

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RR Auction

6-Figure Price Tag Expected For Rare Apple-1 Computer At Auction

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The Passing 7 Minutes Dead
Ultimate daPlaque
Vanity (Instrumental) Diamond D, Nottz
Refuse to Lose Necro
Shenandoah Brian Blade & The Fellowship Band
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Landmarks
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Brian Blade & The Fellowship Band

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Landmarks Brian Blade & The Fellowship Band
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Barb Williamson runs several sobriety houses in Pennsylvania, commercially run homes where residents support each other in their recovery from opioid addiction. Initially, she says, she saw the use of Suboxone or methadone by residents as "a crutch," and banned them. But evidence the medicines can be helpful changed her mind. Kimberly Paynter/WHYY hide caption

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Kimberly Paynter/WHYY

Many 'Recovery Houses' Won't Let Residents Use Medicine To Quit Opioids

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What You Love You Must Love Now Six Parts Seven
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Everywhere and Right Here
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Saving Words for Making Sense Six Parts Seven
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Saving Words for Making Sense
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Third graders on board a floating school in Bangladesh run by the nonprofit group Shidhulai Swanirvar Sangstha. Mahmud Hossain Opu for NPR hide caption

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Mahmud Hossain Opu for NPR

'Floating Schools' Make Sure Kids Get To Class When The Water Rises

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Sticky blnkspc_
Remember Hank Mobley
This I Dig Of You Hank Mobley
Wim Casiio
Bananas Casiio

An election official holds an electronic voting machine memory card following the Georgia primary runoff elections at a polling location in Atlanta on July 24, 2018. A group of Georgia voters is suing the state, saying that the electronic machines are not secure. Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Federal Court Asked To Scrap Georgia's 27,000 Electronic Voting Machines

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Green Stamps Tesk
DatSwing Tesk
Anti Gravity