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Marilyn Bartlett spent two years running Montana's employee health plan. She made better deals with hospitals and drug benefits managers and saved the plan from bankruptcy. Mike Albans for NPR hide caption

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Mike Albans for NPR

Shots - Health News

A Tough Negotiator Proves Employers Can Bargain Down Health Care Prices

A former health insurance executive has made it her mission to bring down high health care costs. She's demanding a better deal for employers — and the workers whose care they pay for.

"Dr. Blasey Ford was so deferential, so polite, so constrained," Rebecca Traister, author of Good and Mad: The Revolutionary Power of Women's Anger, said. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

New Book Looks At Why Women Have The Right To Be 'Good And Mad'

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Marilyn Bartlett spent two years running Montana's employee health plan. She made better deals with hospitals and drug benefits managers and saved the plan from bankruptcy. Mike Albans for NPR hide caption

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Mike Albans for NPR

A Tough Negotiator Proves Employers Can Bargain Down Health Care Prices

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A bail bond office displays a sign near the Santa Ana Jail in Santa Ana, Calif. The most populous state in the nation passed a law to do away with money bail earlier this year. Hector Mata/AP hide caption

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Hector Mata/AP

California's Bail Overhaul May Do More Harm Than Good, Reformers Say

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Leila Abdel Latif is a celebrity fortuneteller in Lebanon. Every New Year's Eve she appears on Lebanese television shows to predict the future of Lebanon and the wider world. Ruth Sherlock/NPR hide caption

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Ruth Sherlock/NPR

Fortunetelling Is A Sort Of Therapy For Stressed-Out Lebanese

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