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Rowers paddle down the Charles River near Harvard University in Cambridge, Mass., on March 7, 2017. Charles Krupa/AP hide caption

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Charles Krupa/AP

Education

Does Harvard Treat Asian-American Applicants Unfairly? The Case Goes To Trial

A federal lawsuit alleging racial discrimination in Harvard University's admissions process goes to court this week. It could have big consequences for higher education.

Charlie Hinderliter got a bad case of the flu back in January. He spent 58 days in the hospital, underwent two surgeries and was in a medically induced coma for a week. Neeta Satam for NPR hide caption

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Neeta Satam for NPR

Last Year, The Flu Put Him In A Coma. This Year He's Getting The Shot

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Shared scooters and bicycles are spreading to several major U.S. cities while policymakers are scrambling to find ways to ensure that riders are safe. David Paul Morris/Getty Images hide caption

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David Paul Morris/Getty Images

As E-Scooters Roll Into American Cities, So Do Safety Concerns

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Rowers paddle down the Charles River near Harvard University in Cambridge, Mass., on March 7, 2017. Charles Krupa/AP hide caption

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Charles Krupa/AP

Does Harvard Treat Asian-American Applicants Unfairly? The Case Goes To Trial

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CEO of Dick's Sporting Goods Ed Stack visits a new store in the Houston area in 2016. In February, Stack pulled assault-style weapons from store shelves and raised the minimum age to buy guns to 21. Scott Dalton/Invision/AP hide caption

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Scott Dalton/Invision/AP

Blue And Red Companies: How CEO Activism Is Reshaping Workforce Politics

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Destroyed homes and debris are seen near Port St. Joe, Fla., on Friday, two days after Hurricane Michael hit the Florida panhandle. Analysts estimate the storm has caused billions of dollars of damage. Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP/Getty Images

Michael Will Cost Insurers Billions, But Won't Overwhelm Industry, Analysts Say

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A man walks through a damaged store in the aftermath of Hurricane Michael in Springfield, Fla., last week. The area still lacks water and power. Many residents of Springfield and neighboring towns live paycheck to paycheck and can't return to work. David Goldman/AP hide caption

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David Goldman/AP

'This Is Where America Lives': Hurricane Michael Devastated Working-Class Towns

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