Morning Edition for December 10, 2018 Hear the Morning Edition program for December 10, 2018

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Lily Padula for NPR

The Trouble With TEACH Grants

Exclusive: Ed Department To Erase Debts Of Teachers, Fix Troubled Grant Program

The move follows an NPR investigation that found thousands of teachers had grants unfairly converted to loans.

Do Ya Thang PRhyme
Rock It PRhyme

Angela Lautner, who lives in Elsmere, Ky., has Type 1 diabetes and is an advocate for affordable insulin. Maddie McGarvey for NPR hide caption

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Maddie McGarvey for NPR

'We're Fighting For Our Lives': Patients Protest Sky-High Insulin Prices

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The people who got caught up in the exercise boom of the 1970s and stuck with it into their senior years now have significantly healthier hearts and muscles than their sedentary counterparts. David Trood/Getty Images hide caption

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David Trood/Getty Images

Exercise Wins: Fit Seniors Can Have Hearts That Look 30 Years Younger

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People Everywhere (Still Alive) Khruangbin
Rikki Don't Lose That Number Steely Dan
Malik Lafayette Afro Rock Band
Transitions El Ten Eleven

Eleanor Roosevelt holds up a copy of The Universal Declaration of Human Rights, adopted by the United Nations in December 1948. Fotosearch/Getty Images hide caption

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Fotosearch/Getty Images

Boundlessly Idealistic, Universal Declaration Of Human Rights Is Still Resisted

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Lobo's Cha Harold López-Nussa
El Viaje Harold López-Nussa

"I like to accept the way people present themselves," photographer Inge Morath said in a 1987 NPR interview. "You never know what you get. It's fascinating ... that's why I like to do portraits." Morath, pictured above in Paris in 1964, is the subject of a new biography by Linda Gordon called Inge Morath: Magnum Legacy, published by Prestel and Magnum Foundation. Lefevre/AP hide caption

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Lefevre/AP

Biography Captures The Charisma And Confidence Of Photographer Inge Morath

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Sugarcane Ana Olgica
Princess Elvira Ana Olgica

Carbon Engineering CEO Steve Oldham stands in front of the company's Squamish, British Columbia, pilot plant. It uses a chemical process to extract carbon dioxide from the air and turn it into a fuel similar to crude oil. Jeff Brady/NPR hide caption

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Jeff Brady/NPR

How One Company Pulls Carbon From The Air, Aiming To Avert A Climate Catastrophe

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Snapback Tesk
Doin It Tesk
On Broadway Myron & E
A Baby For My Bass NTEIBINT
Rain Poppy Ackroyd
Grounds Poppy Ackroyd

An employee at the Utah County Election office puts mail in ballots into a container to register the vote in the midterm elections on November 6. George Frey/Getty Images hide caption

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George Frey/Getty Images

Voting By Mail Is On The Rise, But Could Alleged N.C. Election Fraud Change That?

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Vaults Tor
Loop Theory Tor
Wouldn't It Be Loverly Shelly Manne & His Friends

In this Sept. 1, 2015, file photo, a child waits in line at a migrant reception center in Brussels. Belgian migration minister Theo Francken said on Thursday he wants no part of a United Nations pact on safe and orderly migration, an international deal that has pushed Belgium's government to the brink of collapse. Virginia Mayo/AP hide caption

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Virginia Mayo/AP

A U.N. Migration Pact Is Dividing Europe — And Has Become Fodder For Nationalists

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