Morning Edition for December 21, 2018 Hear the Morning Edition program for December 21, 2018

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Secretary of State Mike Pompeo tells NPR that the U.S. remains committed to the Kurds, American allies in the Syrian war, even as the U.S. plans to withdraw troops from the country. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

National Security

Despite Remaining ISIS Threats, Pompeo Says U.S. Made 'Caliphate In Syria Go Away'

In an interview with NPR, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo expanded on remarks by President Trump, who declared the U.S. had "won against ISIS" and would pull troops from Syria.

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo tells NPR that the U.S. remains committed to the Kurds, American allies in the Syrian war, even as the U.S. plans to withdraw troops from the country. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Despite Remaining ISIS Threats, Pompeo Says U.S. Made 'Caliphate In Syria Go Away'

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Jeanne Satterfield, left, and Barbara Parham, stand in front of Boston's Pine Street Inn homeless shelter in October, where they reconnected for the first time in a decade. They plan to return to the shelter next week to help out for the holidays. Jud Esty-Kendall/StoryCorps hide caption

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Jud Esty-Kendall/StoryCorps

StoryCorps

Reconnecting 10 Years Later 'Was The True Test Of Friendship And Time'

2 min

Reconnecting 10 Years Later 'Was The True Test Of Friendship And Time'

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Before light reaches these rods and cones in the retina, it passes through some specialized cells that send signals to brain areas that affect whether you feel happy or sad. Omikron/Getty Images/Science Source hide caption

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Omikron/Getty Images/Science Source

Scientists Find A Brain Circuit That Could Explain Seasonal Depression

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