Morning Edition for January 4, 2019 Hear the Morning Edition program for January 4, 2019

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Scientists have re-engineered photosynthesis, the foundation of life on Earth, creating genetically modified plants that grow faster and bigger. Above, scientists measure how well modified tobacco plants photosynthesize compared to unmodified plants. Haley Ahlers/RIPE Project hide caption

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Haley Ahlers/RIPE Project

The Salt

Scientists Have 'Hacked Photosynthesis' In Search Of More Productive Crops

Scientists have re-engineered photosynthesis, a foundation of life on Earth, creating genetically modified plants that grow faster and bigger. They hope it leads to bigger harvests of food.

Can't Talk Now Handbook
End Credits Handbook
Kneel Down Neil Cowley Trio
Mission Neil Cowley Trio
Eastynato Daniel Szabo
Drawn Kiasmos
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Swept Kiasmos
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Classic Battle Sam Spence
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Music From National Football League Films Volume IV
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Round-Up Sam Spence

Scientists have re-engineered photosynthesis, the foundation of life on Earth, creating genetically modified plants that grow faster and bigger. Above, scientists measure how well modified tobacco plants photosynthesize compared to unmodified plants. Haley Ahlers/RIPE Project hide caption

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Haley Ahlers/RIPE Project

Scientists Have 'Hacked Photosynthesis' In Search Of More Productive Crops

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Eleven Days Ambient Jazz Ensemble
One of the Best Days Ambient Jazz Ensemble
Dream GallantHorn
Bellweather GallantHorn

Paru Venkat and Alagappa Rammohan pose for a portrait after their StoryCorps interview in Chicago on June 23, 2018. Eliza Lambert/StoryCorps hide caption

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Eliza Lambert/StoryCorps

His Love For Books Reads Like Poetry

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Milo Fredrik
Holm Fredrik
Everything Means Nothing Toe
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Book About My Idle Plot on a Vague Anxiety
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Toe

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Matthew Charles, a Nashville, Tenn., man, was sent back to prison two years after being released. Now he is being released again after the criminal justice reform bill became law. Julieta Martinelli /Nashville Public Radio hide caption

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Julieta Martinelli /Nashville Public Radio

Released From Prison Again, After Criminal Justice Reform Became Law

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Inner Monologue (Instrumental) Michita
Nandodemo (Instrumental) Michita
Leaving Behind a Whaling Economy Wess Meets West
The Bering Sea Wess Meets West
Friday I'm In Love (Orchestral Pop) Walt Ribeiro

The Freelancers Hub in Brooklyn offers classes, shared office space, tax and legal advice for free. Kholood Eid for NPR hide caption

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Kholood Eid for NPR

This New Program Aims To Train The Growing Freelance Workforce

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