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A woman speaks on her phone while driving. Both drivers and walkers use cell data 4,000 percent more than they did in 2008, which means they aren't watching the roads. Pascal Pochard-Casabianca/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Pascal Pochard-Casabianca/AFP/Getty Images

National

Why Pedestrian Deaths Are At A 30-Year High

"It's great advice to tell people to use a crosswalk, but that's not very useful if the crosswalk doesn't exist," says Tom Ellington of the Pedestrian Safety Review Board in Macon, Ga.

A woman speaks on her phone while driving. Both drivers and walkers use cell data 4,000 percent more than they did in 2008, which means they aren't watching the roads. Pascal Pochard-Casabianca/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Pascal Pochard-Casabianca/AFP/Getty Images

Why Pedestrian Deaths Are At A 30-Year High

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On the day of the Lion Air crash, Verian Utama (left) was traveling on the flight with a former pro rider named Andrea Manfredi (right), a friend who also perished. Courtesy of Verian Utama's family hide caption

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Courtesy of Verian Utama's family

For Family Of A Lion Air Crash Victim, 'The Happiness Is Gone'

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A historical marker commemorates the 1979 nuclear accident at Three Mile Island — the most serious in U.S. history. To the left are the cooling towers for the mothballed Unit 2 reactor, which partially melted down. Joanne Cassaro/WITF hide caption

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Joanne Cassaro/WITF

40 Years After A Partial Nuclear Meltdown, A New Push To Keep Three Mile Island Open

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"Facebook is discriminating against people based upon who they are and where they live," Housing and Urban Development Secretary Ben Carson said in a statement. Carlos Osorio/AP hide caption

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Carlos Osorio/AP

Housing Department Slaps Facebook With Discrimination Charge

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