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Carolyn DeFord poses with the missing persons poster for her mother, Leona Kinsey, who went missing in October 1999. Dupe Oyebolu/StoryCorps hide caption

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Dupe Oyebolu/StoryCorps

StoryCorps

'It Surfaces With The Same Rawness': A Daughter Remembers Her Mother's Disappearance

Carolyn DeFord, a member of the Puyallup tribe, was 26 when her mother suddenly vanished. At StoryCorps, she remembers what life has been like having never learned what happened.

Smog fills Utah's Salt Lake Valley in January 2017. Winter weather in the area often traps air pollution that is bad for public health. George Frey/Getty Images hide caption

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George Frey/Getty Images

EPA Science Panel Considering Guidelines That Upend Basic Air Pollution Science

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One of the Trump administration's proposals would change the prices Medicare pays for certain prescription drugs by factoring in the average prices Europeans pay for the same medicines. Simon Dawson/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Simon Dawson/Bloomberg via Getty Images

It Will Take More Than Transparency To Reduce Drug Prices, Economists Say

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Carolyn DeFord poses with the missing persons poster for her mother, Leona Kinsey, who went missing in October 1999. Dupe Oyebolu/StoryCorps hide caption

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Dupe Oyebolu/StoryCorps

'It Surfaces With The Same Rawness': A Daughter Remembers Her Mother's Disappearance

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The Social Security Administration is reviving a practice from a decade ago of sending letters out to employers when Social Security numbers don't match their records. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP

The Latest Immigration Crackdown May Be Fake Social Security Numbers

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