Morning Edition for April 8, 2019 Hear the Morning Edition program for April 8, 2019

Morning EditionMorning Edition

A new treatment for allergies is gaining popularity. Sublingual immunotherapy works to tame the immune response, much like allergy shots. Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Getty Images

Shots - Health News

Seasonal Sniffles? Immunotherapy Tablets Can Replace Allergy Shots For Some Allergens

Many allergists have started to prescribe immunotherapy tablets to some of their patients. They're safe and convenient and, like allergy shots, they treat the root cause of your allergic misery.

A new treatment for allergies is gaining popularity. Sublingual immunotherapy works to tame the immune response, much like allergy shots. Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Getty Images

Seasonal Sniffles? Immunotherapy Tablets Catch On As An Alternative To Allergy Shots

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/710243786/710953536" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Shara and Robert Watkins hold their 5-month-old daughter, Kaiya, in their home in San Mateo, Calif., just after she had woken up from an afternoon nap. Lindsey Moore/KQED hide caption

toggle caption
Lindsey Moore/KQED

Prenatal Testing Can Ease Minds Or Heighten Anxieties

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/710204097/710953542" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

President Trump vowed in January to "detect and destroy any missile launched against the United States anywhere, anytime, anyplace." Doing so would likely mean basing defenses in space. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Evan Vucci/AP

Trump's Plan To Zap Incoming Missiles With Lasers Is Back To The Future

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/707689746/710953548" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Barbara holds an imprint of her grandson Alijah's hand and foot that she was given after he died. Jessica, the baby's aunt, called 911 when he was found limp. The operator failed to recognize that the baby was in cardiac arrest, meaning that his heart had stopped and he was not breathing, according to three emergency medical experts who reviewed a recording of the 911 call. Kayana Szymczak for ProPublica hide caption

toggle caption
Kayana Szymczak for ProPublica

A Baby In Cardiac Arrest And An Emergency Dispatcher Who Did Not Know Telephone CPR

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/710331622/710953554" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Searching for a song you heard between stories? We've retired music buttons on these pages. Learn more here.

Morning EditionMorning Edition