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The trick, of course, is to find moments of deep relaxation wherever you are, not just on vacation. Laughing with friends can be another way to start breaking the cycle of chronic stress and help keep your heart healthy, too. stock_colors/Getty Images hide caption

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Shots - Health News

High Stress Drives Up Your Risk Of A Heart Attack. Here's How To Chill Out

A study of siblings finds those who have a stress-related disorder have a 60 percent higher risk of heart attack or other cardiovascular event, compared to their less-stressed brothers and sisters.

The trick, of course, is to find moments of deep relaxation wherever you are, not just on vacation. Laughing with friends can be another way to start breaking the cycle of chronic stress and help keep your heart healthy, too. stock_colors/Getty Images hide caption

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stock_colors/Getty Images

High Stress Drives Up Your Risk Of A Heart Attack. Here's How To Chill Out

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Jessica Calise checks on Joseph as he gets ready for bed. Joseph used to be afraid to sleep alone, but he has learned to be OK with it since his mother learned new parenting approaches. Christopher Capozziello for NPR hide caption

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Christopher Capozziello for NPR

For Kids With Anxiety, Parents Learn To Let Them Face Their Fears

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Women's Work: A Reckoning with Work and Home, by Megan Stack Doubleday hide caption

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Doubleday

'Women's Work' Delves Into Gender Roles At Home And Relationships With Domestic Help

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The IRS budget has been cut sharply over the past decade, but President Trump has suggested spending an extra $362 million on tax enforcement next year. Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images

On Tax Day, The IRS Is Short Of Money

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