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The White House honored economist Art Laffer with the Presidential Medal of Freedom. For decades, Laffer has promoted the idea that tax cuts pay for themselves, against all evidence to the contrary. Sarah L. Voisin/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Sarah L. Voisin/The Washington Post/Getty Images

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From A Napkin To A White House Medal — The Path Of A Controversial Economic Idea

Art Laffer received the Presidential Medal of Freedom Wednesday. For decades, Laffer has promoted the idea that tax cuts pay for themselves, against all evidence to the contrary.

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The Things That U Do (Totally Bumpin' Instrumental) DJ Jazzy Jeff & the Fresh Prince
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The White House honored economist Art Laffer with the Presidential Medal of Freedom. For decades, Laffer has promoted the idea that tax cuts pay for themselves, against all evidence to the contrary. Sarah L. Voisin/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Sarah L. Voisin/The Washington Post/Getty Images

From A Napkin To A White House Medal — The Path Of A Controversial Economic Idea

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Perspectives Christian Scott aTunde Adjuah
Liberation Over Gangsterism Christian Scott aTunde Adjuah
The Line Ahmad Jamal
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Workers makes shoes at a factory in Jinjiang, in southeast China's Fujian province. Nearly all shoes sold in the U.S. are foreign-made. China's share has declined, but it's still a major source. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Why The American Shoe Disappeared And Why It's So Hard To Bring It Back

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