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Majid Takht Ravanchi, Iran's ambassador to the United Nations, pictured here in 2015 at a news conference in Mexico City. In an exclusive interview with NPR, Ravanchi said flaring tensions between Washington and Tehran have made diplomatic talks hostile. Daniel Cardenas/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Daniel Cardenas/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

Politics

Iran's U.N. Ambassador: U.S. Escalating Hostilities Like A 'Knife Under Your Throat'

In an interview with NPR, Majid Takht Ravanchi also denied responsibility for the attack on two tankers last week and steadfastly maintained that Iran is not interested in war.

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All the Optimism of Early January Lullatone
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Straight up Raining Mammal Hands

Knox Williams, the president and executive director of American Suppressor Association, and Josh Savani, the director of research and information office at the NRA Institute for Legislative Action, explain, what they say, are the benefits of using firearm suppressors. Shuran Huang/NPR hide caption

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Shuran Huang/NPR

The Gun Industry Pushes Back On Call To Ban Suppressors In Virginia

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My Friend Coma Rocket Miner
Somewhere Between Nightmares and Dreams Rocket Miner

Breakdown on 20th Ave. South is Buddy & Julie Miller's first album together in nearly a decade. Kate York/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Kate York/Courtesy of the artist

Missed For A Decade, Roots Icons Buddy And Julie Miller Return To A Shared Spotlight

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Everything Is Your Fault Buddy & Julie Miller
Thinking of a Place The War on Drugs

CRISPR technology already allows scientists to make very precise modifications to DNA, and it could revolutionize how doctors prevent and treat many diseases. But using it to create gene-edited babies is still widely considered unethical. Gregor Fischer/picture alliance via Getty Images hide caption

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Gregor Fischer/picture alliance via Getty Images

A Russian Biologist Wants To Create More Gene-Edited Babies

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Divinity WHITE KATANA
Revelations WHITE KATANA

Maria Ochoa poses by the Arizona-Mexico border wall, south of Tucson, Ariz. Camila Kerwin/StoryCorps hide caption

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Camila Kerwin/StoryCorps

1st-Generation Mexican American Attempts To Save Migrant Lives In The Arizona Desert

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Milo Fredrik
Holm Fredrik
Angels (Kygo Edit) The XX
Wandering Through Kunsthal Teen Daze
On the Edge of a New Age Teen Daze
You've Got a Friend in Me Randy Newman
Prepping the Jump Randy Newman
Friday I'm in Love Midnite String Quartet

Majid Takht Ravanchi, Iran's ambassador to the United Nations, pictured here in 2015 at a news conference in Mexico City. In an exclusive interview with NPR, Ravanchi said flaring tensions between Washington and Tehran have made diplomatic talks hostile. Daniel Cardenas/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Daniel Cardenas/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

Iran's U.N. Ambassador: U.S. Escalating Hostilities Like A 'Knife Under Your Throat'

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The Supreme Court has struck down a conviction of a death row inmate, citing racial bias in jury selection. Eric Baradat/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Eric Baradat/AFP/Getty Images

Supreme Court Strikes Down Conviction Of Mississippi Man On Death Row For 22 Years

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