Morning Edition for July 22, 2019 Hear the Morning Edition program for July 22, 2019

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Sovereign Valentine and his wife, Jessica, wait as a dialysis machine filters his blood. Before finding a dialysis clinic in their insurance network, the Valentines were charged more than a half-million dollars for 14 weeks of treatment. Tommy Martino/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Tommy Martino/Kaiser Health News

Shots - Health News

First Came Kidney Failure, Then There Was The $540,842 Bill For Dialysis

A personal trainer in Montana had a sudden need for lifesaving dialysis after his kidneys failed. But he and his wife never expected the huge bill they received for 14 weeks of care.

Moon In Water Gold Panda
Mirror Can Only Lie

Steve Wickham, at home in Grundy County, Tenn., has developed an educational seminar with his wife, and fellow nurse, Karen, that they are using to help people with Type II diabetes bring blood sugar under control with less reliance on drugs. Blake Farmer/WPLN hide caption

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Blake Farmer/WPLN

2 Nurses In Tennessee Preach 'Diabetes Reversal'

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Waiting For Nothing Moonlit Sailor
Landvetter Moonlit Sailor
All In Flying Lotus

Pakistan's Prime Minister Imran Khan (right), shown here in April, will arrive in Washington, D.C., for a three-day visit that begins on July 21. His meeting with President Trump comes at a pivotal time for Afghan peace negotiations. Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Pool/Getty Images

Hoping For Improved U.S. Ties, Pakistan's Prime Minister Set To Visit White House

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Dark Peers Tristeza
A Traves De Los Ojos De Nuestras Hijas Tristeza
The Hype Cookie Jar
Mad Man Cookie Jar
Untitled Ramtin Arablouei
Bullet Beware of Safety

Artists are requesting that the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York remove their work from its biennial showcase over a museum board member's ties to the sale of law enforcement supplies including tear gas. Bebeto Matthews/AP hide caption

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Bebeto Matthews/AP

At Whitney Museum Biennial, 8 Artists Withdraw In Protest Of Link To Tear Gas Sales

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Snatched B.O Mitz
Divorcity B.O Mitz

Sovereign Valentine and his wife, Jessica, wait as a dialysis machine filters his blood. Before finding a dialysis clinic in their insurance network, the Valentines were charged more than a half-million dollars for 14 weeks of treatment. Tommy Martino/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Tommy Martino/Kaiser Health News

First Came Kidney Failure. Then There Was The $540,842 Bill For Dialysis

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Praze Plaid
Crown Shy Plaid
Everything To Say Jim-E Stack
Raven GoGo Penguin
Return To Text GoGo Penguin
Occasional Magic Yppah
Owl Beach II Yppah
Seven Seas Of Rhye [Instrumental Mix 2011] Queen

The courthouse in Luzerne County, Pa., where officials this month sent letters to parents who had unpaid cafeteria debt, threatening to take parents to court if the obligations were not settled. John Greim/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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John Greim/LightRocket via Getty Images

Don't Have Lunch Money? A Pennsylvania School District Threatens Foster Care

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Equifax will pay up to $700 million in a proposed settlement over its 2017 data breach. Mike Stewart/AP hide caption

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Mike Stewart/AP

Equifax To Pay Up To $700 Million In Data Breach Settlement

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