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An employee of the Boston biotech company Ginkgo Bioworks runs a gene sequencing machine through its paces. The company synthesizes thousands of genes a month, which are then inserted into cells that become mini factories of useful products. Tim Llewellyn/Copperhound Pictures/Ginkgo Bioworks hide caption

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Tim Llewellyn/Copperhound Pictures/Ginkgo Bioworks

Shots - Health News

As Made-To-Order DNA Gets Cheaper, Keeping It Out Of The Wrong Hands Gets Harder

Labs are churning out more and more synthetic DNA for scientists who want to use it to reprogram cells. Some say the technology has outpaced government safety guidelines put in place a decade ago.

5/4 Clogs
I do Exist The Civil Wars

Chanel Miller was sexually assaulted by Brock Turner in 2015. The lenient sentence Turner received elicited widespread controversy and helped inspire new legislation in California. Elias Williams for NPR hide caption

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Elias Williams for NPR

Chanel Miller, Sexual Assault Survivor, On The 'Immense Relief' Of Going Public

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Sugarcane Ana Olgica
Suburban Sunrise Ran the Man
Travellers Ran the Man
Memories Tamsui
Rich Coast Damma Beatz

Opera singer Plácido Domingo performs in Szeged, Hungary, on Aug. 28. In a meeting on Saturday, the Metropolitan Opera's general manager discussed why he has not suspended or investigated Domingo, who has been accused of sexual misconduct by 20 women. Attila Kisbenedek/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Attila Kisbenedek/AFP/Getty Images

Met Opera Chief: 20 Women's Accusations Against Plácido Domingo 'Not Corroborated'

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Macbeth: Overture (Preludio) Giuseppe Verdi
La traviata: Ah, fors'e lui - Instrumental Giuseppe Verdi
Winter Of The Electric Beach Olan Mill
Pine Olan Mill
Fate Calls Mikolai Stroinski
Calm Before the Storm Mikolai Stroinski
Draumzer Jonas Rathsman
Tobago Jonas Rathsman
Not That Tech House DJ Tool Dropped by Paris Hilton You Were Searching For Twin Peaks

Sacramento Mayor Darrell Steinberg (center), head of Big City Mayors, discusses the homeless problem after the group met with California Gov. Gavin Newsom in March. Steinberg says it's time for any adversarial relationship between cities and the Trump administration to end. Rich Pedroncelli/AP hide caption

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Rich Pedroncelli/AP

The Ongoing Clash Between Trump And Big Cities

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Where I Met You Moods
Bucket List Moods, Philanthrope, Yasper

President Trump speaks before the U.N. General Assembly on Sept. 25, 2018. He'll address the assembly for the third time this week amid concerns about the role of U.S. leadership in the world. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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John Moore/Getty Images

Trump Returns To The U.N. This Week Facing Growing Unease About U.S. Leadership

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Trunk Popped The Admiral
GridWorld _91ultra
House on the Hill Ms Bronx

An employee of the Boston biotech company Ginkgo Bioworks runs a gene sequencing machine through its paces. The company synthesizes thousands of genes a month, which are then inserted into cells that become mini factories of useful products. Tim Llewellyn/Copperhound Pictures/Ginkgo Bioworks hide caption

toggle caption
Tim Llewellyn/Copperhound Pictures/Ginkgo Bioworks

As Made-To-Order DNA Gets Cheaper, Keeping It Out Of The Wrong Hands Gets Harder

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