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Indian spiritual and political leader Mohandas Gandhi circa 1935. Hulton Archive/Getty Images hide caption

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Hulton Archive/Getty Images

World

Gandhi Is Deeply Revered, But His Attitudes On Race And Sex Are Under Scrutiny

He has been called racist, sexist and not manly enough. But the spiritual and political leader — who would have turned 150 on Wednesday — is deeply revered in India and around the world.

Hamdullah Mohib, Afghanistan's national security adviser, speaks during the United Nations General Assembly in New York City on Monday. After U.S.-Taliban talks excluded Afghanistan's government and collapsed last month, Mohib tells NPR that the only way to lasting peace is to include the country's leaders. Don Emmert/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Don Emmert/AFP/Getty Images

The Afghan Government Must Lead Peace Talks, Its National Security Adviser Says

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Indian spiritual and political leader Mohandas Gandhi circa 1935. Hulton Archive/Getty Images hide caption

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Hulton Archive/Getty Images

Gandhi Is Deeply Revered, But His Attitudes On Race And Sex Are Under Scrutiny

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A worker cuts black granite to make a countertop. Though granite, marble and "engineered stone" all can produce harmful silica dust when cut, ground or polished, the artificial stone typically contains much more silica, says a CDC researcher tracking cases of silicosis. danishkhan/Getty Images hide caption

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danishkhan/Getty Images

Shots - Health News

Workers Are Falling Ill, Even Dying, After Making Kitchen Countertops

5 min

Workers Are Falling Ill, Even Dying, After Making Kitchen Countertops

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