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The Supreme Court justices, pictured in November 2018, start a new term on Monday. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Law

The Supreme Court March To The Right: Fast And Furious, Or Incremental?

Separation of church and state, immigration and questions about impeachment could be on the table this term, which starts Monday and will almost surely be a march to the right on flashpoint issues.

Lost Child Freddie Joachim
Midnight Trains Freddie Joachim
The Lovers Evocativ
Seasons Evocativ
Angels (Kygo Edit) The XX

The Supreme Court justices, pictured in November 2018, start a new term on Monday. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Abortion, Guns And Gay Rights On The Docket For Supreme Court's New Term

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Karusellen Tingvall Trio
Sjuan Tingvall Trio
Mesopelagic Transmissions Seas of Years
Aerial Convergence Seas of Years

Corn from a fall harvest in Guatemala. John Seaton Callahan/Getty Images hide caption

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John Seaton Callahan/Getty Images

In Guatemala, A Bad Year For Corn — And For U.S. Aid

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Bird Taking Flight aAirial
Your Own Home aAirial
Path of Totality The American Dollar
Everything The American Dollar

An April 16, 2019 photo shows the Department of Justice in Washington, DC. MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images

'Deep State' Author Says Trump Has Learned Nothing From The Russia Investigation

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Lyre Grounds [Hidden Orchestra Remix] Hidden Orchestra & Poppy Ackroyd
5 Steps [Hidden Orchestra Remix] Hidden Orchestra & Clarinet Factory
Latitude (Remix) Nujabes feat. Five Deez
Ellipsis ambinate
Decades and Moments ambinate
Shed Kiasmos
Blurred Kiasmos
My First Car Vulfpeck

Kathleen O'Donnell, left, with her wife, Casey. Since 2014, the couple has lived in Billings, Mont., where there is no explicit law that protects LGBTQ people from discrimination in housing, employment or public accommodations. Courtesy of Kathleen O'Donnell hide caption

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Courtesy of Kathleen O'Donnell

Are LGBTQ Employees Safe From Discrimination? A New Supreme Court Case Will Decide

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